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Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bloviate

1857, American English, a Midwestern word for "to talk aimlessly and boastingly; to indulge in 'high falutin'," according to Farmer (1890), who seems to have been the only British lexicographer to notice it. He says it was based on blow (v.) on the model of deviate, etc.\n

\nIt seems to have been felt as outdated slang already by late 19c. ("It was a leasure for him to hear the Doctor talk, or, as it was inelegantly expressed in the phrase of the period, 'bloviate' ...." ["Overland Monthly," San Francisco, 1872, describing a scene from 1860]), but it enjoyed a revival early 1920s during the presidency of Warren G. Harding, who wrote a notoriously ornate and incomprehensible prose (e.e. cummings eulogized him as "The only man, woman or child who wrote a simple declarative sentence with seven grammatical errors") at which time the word took on its connection with political speech; it faded again thereafter, but, with its derivative, bloviation, it enjoyed a revival in the 2000 U.S. election season that continued through the era of blogging.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

bloviate

bloviate \blo"vi*ate\ (bl[=o]"v[i^]*[=a]t), v. i. [imp. & p. p. bloviated (bl[=o]"v[i^]*[=a]*t[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. bloviating (bl[=o]"v[i^]*[=a]*t[i^]ng).] To orate pompously; -- used especially of politicians and news commentators.
--Frank Rich (N. Y. Times Jan. 6, 1999, p. A23) -- blo"vi*a*tor, n. -- blo"vi*a*tion, n.

``We've had almost three weeks of lawyers bloviating about what the facts in the case are,'' Mr. Rogan said. ``Wouldn't it be easier to bring the witnesses?''
--Quoted by Eric Schmitt in (The New York Times), Jan 22, 1999, p. A15.

Wiktionary

bloviate

vb. (context US English) To speak or discourse at length in a pompous or boastful manner.

WordNet

bloviate

v. orate verbosely and windily

Usage examples of "bloviate".

On the other hand, Wilson could not bloviate, as the windbag Harding put it: speak impromptu with incoherent passion.

Weeks before the Iraq invasion, Senator Teddy Kennedy was bloviating about North Korea on CNN, saying, "Our principal focus and attention today ought to be what is happening in North Korea.

All the bloviating they've been doing has been pretty much for form's sake.