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Bloom

Bloom or blooming may refer to:

Bloom (Audio Adrenaline album)

Bloom is the third studio album released by Audio Adrenaline. In 1999, the album was certified gold by RIAA.

Bloom (store)

Bloom was a chain of mid-grade North American grocery stores operated by Food Lion, originally established in 2004. The parent company of Food Lion, The Delhaize Group, announced in January 2012 that it was discontinuing the Bloom brand. Bloom's headquarters are/were in Salisbury, North Carolina.

Bloom (novel)

Bloom, written in 1998, is the fifth science fiction novel written by Wil McCarthy. It was first released as a hardcover in September 1998. Almost a year later, in August 1999, its first mass market edition was published. An ebook reprint was published in 2011.

Bloom is one of Borders' "Best 10 Books of 1998" and is a New York Times Notable Book. The premise of the book is how to handle human technology that has evolved beyond human control.

Bloom (shader effect)

Bloom (sometimes referred to as light bloom or glow) is a computer graphics effect used in video games, demos and high dynamic range rendering (HDRR) to reproduce an imaging artifact of real-world cameras. The effect produces fringes (or feathers) of light extending from the borders of bright areas in an image, contributing to the illusion of an extremely bright light overwhelming the camera or eye capturing the scene.

Bloom (Jeff Coffin album)

Bloom was the fourth album released by Jeff Coffin, released in 2005. This album was the second album recorded and released with the Mu'tet, a constantly changing group of guest musicians that play with Coffin.

Bloom (test)

Bloom is a test to measure the strength of a gel or gelatin. The test was originally developed and patented in 1925 by O. T. Bloom. The test determines the weight (in grams) needed by a probe (normally with a diameter of 0.5 inch) to deflect the surface of the gel 4 mm without breaking it. The result is expressed in Bloom (grades). It is usually between 30 and 300 Bloom. This method is most often used on soft gels. To perform the Bloom test on gelatin, a 6.67% gelatin solution is kept for 17-18 hours at 10°C prior to being tested.

Bloom (Eric Johnson album)

Bloom is Eric Johnson's fifth studio release, released in June 2005. It was the first studio release since his 1996 album Venus Isle almost nine years prior. However, in these nine years he had released a live album by his side-project Alien Love Child entitled Live and Beyond in 2000 as well as an album of previously unreleased material titled Souvenir in 2002.

The album is split into three sections, 'Prelude' (tracks 1-6), 'Courante' (tracks 7-12) and 'Allemande' (tracks 13-16). The album was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2006 under the category of Best Pop Instrumental Album.

Bloom (Gabriel & Dresden album)

Bloom is a 2004 compilation album by Gabriel & Dresden that collects songs by the duo and various other artists from the Nettwerk label. The first three tracks were originally featured on the EPArcadia.

Bloom (Lou Rhodes album)

Bloom is Lou Rhodes' second solo album, released in 2007.

Opening track "The Rain" was released as a single, backed with "Gabriel", an acoustic version of the song by Rhodes' former band Lamb, and "Satellite", a cover version of Elliott Smith's song from his second album.

The album was positively received by the BBC and WalesOnline.

Bloom (software)

Bloom is a generative music application for iOS created by Brian Eno and Peter Chilvers. The software plays a low drone, and touching the screen produces different tones, which play in a loop. If the screen is left untouched, the software will create its own music.

Eno and Chilvers have since released a related app named trope and another in 2012 named Scape.

Bloom (film)

Bloom is a 2003 Irish film written and directed by Sean Walsh, based on the novel Ulysses by James Joyce. The film premiered at the 2003 Taormina Film Festival. Angeline Ball won the award for "Best Actress in a Film" at the Irish Film and Television Awards. The soundtrack was written and produced by David Kahne.

In 1967, the novel Ulysses was made into a film of the same name.

Bloom (Gigolo Aunts song)

"Bloom" is a song written and performed by Gigolo Aunts. It was first released in fall 1991 as the A-side to a 7" single, backed with " Cope", on the independent Summerville label. After appearing as a track on the October 1992 " Cope" single (Blaze58), it was released again as a single in its own right in January 1993 by Alias Records. In July 1993, it appeared as the lead track of the Full-On Bloom EP and later that year appeared on the Gigolo Aunts' album Flippin' Out. In support of that album, it was released as a promo single in the US in 1994 by RCA/BMG.

Bloom (company)

Bloom is a Young Enterprise company founded in 2013 that takes part in the mobile application and industry and also produces phone holders. It is the second largest Young Enterprise company in the world according to Facebook statistics. The company was founded by nine people with the lead of Blanka Csizmadia, the corporation's CEO.

Bloom (Rüfüs album)

Bloom is the second studio album of the alternative dance group, Rüfüs, released in Australia under Sweat It Out on 22 January 2016.

Bloom (Caligula's Horse album)

Bloom is the third studio album by Australian progressive rock band Caligula’s Horse. It was released through Inside Out Music on October 16, 2015 in Australia and October 30, 2015 in the United States. The album was recorded at Heaven’s Gate Studios in Brisbane then mixed and mastered by Brendan Anthony and Jens Bogren, respectively. The album was produced by guitarist Sam Vallen.

Bloom (surname)

Bloom is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Adam Bloom (born 1971), English comedian
  • Alan Bloom (1906–2005), English nurseryman
  • Allan Bloom (1930–1992), American philosopher and author
  • Andy Bloom (born 1973), American Olympic shot putter
  • Benjamin Bloom (1913–1999), American educator
  • Benjamin Bloom (musician) (born 1982), English musician
  • Bill Bloom American songwriter and musician (born 1948)
  • Bobby Bloom (1945–1974), American singer songwriter best known as one hit wonder for "Montego Bay" in 1970
  • Claire Bloom (born 1931), British actor
  • David Bloom (1963–2003), NBC journalist
  • Harold Bloom (born 1930), American literary critic
  • Harry Bloom (1913–1981), South African novelist and activist
  • Howard Bloom (born 1943), American author
  • Hyman Bloom (1913–2009), American artist
  • Jeff R. Bloom (born 1976), Galactic Battles creator
  • Jeremiah B. Bloom (1913–1983), New York state senator
  • Jeremy Bloom (born 1982), American athlete
  • John Bloom (disambiguation), several people
  • Lily Bloom, French actress
  • Luka Bloom (born 1955), Irish musician
  • Matt Bloom (born 1972), American wrestler
  • Moses Bloom (1833–1893), American politician, mayor of Iowa City
  • Myer Bloom (1928 – 2016), Canadian physicist
  • Orlando Bloom (born 1977), English actor
  • Philip Bloom (disambiguation), several people
  • Rachel Bloom (born 1987), American actress
  • Rube Bloom (1902–1976), American composer
  • Steve Bloom (born 1953), photographer
  • Ursula Bloom (1892–1984), English writer
  • Verna Bloom (born 1939), American actress, best known for role in Animal House
  • William Bloom (born 1948), British educator

Bloom (Beach House album)

Bloom is the fourth studio album by American dream pop duo Beach House. It was co-produced by the band and Chris Coady, and was released on May 15, 2012, on Sub Pop, Bella Union, Arts & Crafts México, and Mistletone. The album was written over two years of touring and was recorded at Sonic Ranch in Tornillo, Texas over seven weeks. Building on their previous album, Teen Dream (2010), the duo continued to add live drums to their song arrangements for Bloom, supplementing their drum machine rhythms.

Bloom received positive reviews from critics and debuted at number seven on the Billboard 200, selling 41,000 copies in its first week. It was ranked by many critics as one of the year's best albums, and in August 2014, was recognized on Pitchfork Media's list of "The 100 Best Albums of the Decade So Far".

Bloom (Gain song)

"Bloom" is a song by South Korean recording artist Gain, from her second extended play Talk About S. It was written by Kim Eana, arranged and composed by Lee Min-soo. The song was released digitally as the lead single from the album on October 5, 2012, by LOEN Entertainment.

A modern dance-pop song with funk influences, "Bloom" talks about the delightful and positive feelings of a girl while experiencing sex for the first time. Upon its release, the song was deemed as one of the best tracks from the album.

Bloom (music venue)

Bloom is an alternative music club founded on 16 May 1987 in Mezzago in Brianza and still active, which hosts mainly live concerts, but also film screenings arthouse either outdoors or in the dedicated room, music competitions, courses, exhibitions of art and photography.

It is run by the Social Cooperative "Il Visconte di Mezzago" aiming to "concretely demonstrate that it is possible to live in this society without surrendering neither the logic of consumerism and corporations nor cultural atrophy." The Bloom has always led a constant and varied music programming at a rate of more than 100 concerts a year and theme days and is still a reference point for Lombard music lovers.

Bloom (Tasmin Archer album)

Bloom is the second full-length album by British singer-songwriter Tasmin Archer, released on March 25, 1996.

Archer started working on a follow-up to her successful debut album Great Expectations in late 1994, after the release of the Elvis Costello covers EP Shipbuilding early in the year. While continuing to work with her songwriting partner John Hughes, Bloom marked her first album without longtime collaborator John Beck, who played and co-wrote most of her debut album and left her in the middle of 1993.

While her debut album had a plethora of producers, for Bloom Archer and Hughes settled with American producer Mitchell Froom. Recording of the album took place between December 1994 to May 1995, and was recorded at Real World Studios in England and Sunset Sound Factory in Los Angeles. Archer described the recording sessions as "a very relaxed affair"

EMI Records, however, were not supportive of the material that Archer had recorded, deeming it too uncommercial and too removed from the sound of her debut album. Archer and Hughes had to fight for almost a year with EMI executives to get the album released in the form they wanted it to be.

When it was finally released, EMI were still not very supportive of it and didn't push a marketing campaign as big as they had done with her debut album, which damaged sales of the singles and the album itself. When released, the album went fairly unnoticed, only peaking at #95 in the album charts, and the two singles released off the album did not enter the UK top forty. The album was released around Europe and Japan, but EMI America refused to release the album in the USA, and therefore Archer is seen as a one-hit wonder there.

Archer, disillusioned with EMI, was let go of the label in 1997, and would disappear from the music scene for several years until returning in 2006 with her third studio album.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bloom

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
flowers bloom (=start appearing on a plant)
▪ Spring flowers bloomed in the meadows.
in full leaf/bloom
▪ The roses were now in full bloom.
the flowers are in bloom (also the flowers are out) (= they appear on a plant)
▪ At this time of the year, the flowers are in bloom.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
algal
▪ They were surprised to find that carbon dioxide concentrations were higher in water taken from inside the algal blooms than outside it.
▪ Nitrates contribute to nutrient enrichment which encourages algal growth and blooms.
▪ Your cloudiness is an algal bloom rather than bacterial, and is not connected with the Nitrex filter.
full
▪ What Forest displayed at Elland Road were not green shoots of recovery but a field of talent in full bloom.
▪ Neither did the cherry blossoms, which were in full bloom when we arrived.
▪ Is it the wide range of colours, the beauty of the bud opening into full bloom, or the scent?
▪ Red and pink roses on the campus were in full bloom.
▪ There were marvellous flowerbeds, rose-gardens and herbaceous borders, well-established trees and shrubberies in full bloom.
▪ In California, the Arts and Crafts movement came into full bloom.
▪ Bright wedding-red flowers in full bloom stood cloistered on the steps.
▪ It was a beautiful California day, and the jacarandas were in full purple bloom.
good
▪ Roses are heavy feeders at the best of times, and pruning for more and better bloom drives a plant even harder.
▪ Sun will produce the best blooms in summer and fall.
▪ June Disbud hybrid tea roses for the best blooms and give them a foliar feed if it is necessary.
▪ A rich, moist soil and an open situation he considered ideal for producing the best blooms.
■ VERB
produce
▪ A rich, moist soil and an open situation he considered ideal for producing the best blooms.
▪ Sun will produce the best blooms in summer and fall.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After a long confinement, it put the bloom back in her cheeks, Uncle Billy says.
▪ Handsome glaucous foliage and erect narrow spikes of white and yellow blooms held just above the water.
▪ His right arm, the one on the handle, was completely submerged in blooms.
▪ Is it the wide range of colours, the beauty of the bud opening into full bloom, or the scent?
▪ Mustard in bloom, mustard in art, mustard in food, even a mustard competition.
▪ Several other blooms lay bright and brittle between the back pages of the diary, each one neatly labelled.
▪ The bloom will be off the rose.
▪ You might apply a 12-24-12 fertilizer early next spring to encourage blooms.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
flower
▪ Let a thousand flowers bloom and all that ... Ten in the morning, and Mary and Reggie were still in bed.
▪ Ordinarily that is an indication the offense is in full flower, blooming all over the bloody place.
▪ The flowers bloom in several shades, especially blue, pink and white.
▪ Most flowers are done blooming in the woods.
▪ But for once we had chosen mid-summer - and wild flowers bloomed in profusion.
▪ Let a thousand flowers bloom while we cultivate and improve our own gardens through such efforts as the Pew group is undertaking.
▪ The flowers would be blooming in the Alps by now, he thought.
▪ Lacy elder flowers bloomed in the meadows.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The experiment bloomed into a $50 million business.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But we have made deserts bloom before: could we do the same thing on the Moon?
▪ From 1891 to 1911 the association bloomed.
▪ Its small experiment with a house brand called Arizona has bloomed into $ 50 million a year in business.
▪ My house feels solid and safe and orderly; hyacinths and narcissus bloom indoors here even in the dead of winter.
▪ The apple trees had already finished blooming, but the tiny green fruit could hardly be called apples yet.
▪ The house looked much the same, except that a sheaf of cream and red tulips had suddenly bloomed by the front door.
▪ They bloom virtually all year round, and some have interesting leaf colours or scents too.
▪ They are the wild flowers of our experience that are cultivated to bloom all our lives.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Bloom

Bloom \Bloom\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bloomed; p. pr. & vb. n. Blooming.]

  1. To produce or yield blossoms; to blossom; to flower or be in flower.

    A flower which once In Paradise, fast by the tree of life, Began to bloom.
    --Milton.

  2. To be in a state of healthful, growing youth and vigor; to show beauty and freshness, as of flowers; to give promise, as by or with flowers.

    A better country blooms to view,

    Beneath a brighter sky.
    --Logan.

Bloom

Bloom \Bloom\, v. t.

  1. To cause to blossom; to make flourish. [R.]

    Charitable affection bloomed them.
    --Hooker.

  2. To bestow a bloom upon; to make blooming or radiant. [R.]
    --Milton.

    While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day.
    --Keats.

Bloom

Bloom \Bloom\, n. [OE. blome, fr. Icel. bl?m, bl?mi; akin to Sw. blom, Goth. bl?ma, OS. bl?mo, D. bloem, OHG. bluomo, bluoma, G. blume; fr. the same root as AS. bl?wan to blow, blossom. See Blow to bloom, and cf. Blossom.]

  1. A blossom; the flower of a plant; an expanded bud; flowers, collectively.

    The rich blooms of the tropics.
    --Prescott.

  2. The opening of flowers in general; the state of blossoming or of having the flowers open; as, the cherry trees are in bloom. ``Sight of vernal bloom.''
    --Milton.

  3. A state or time of beauty, freshness, and vigor; an opening to higher perfection, analogous to that of buds into blossoms; as, the bloom of youth.

    Every successive mother has transmitted a fainter bloom, a more delicate and briefer beauty.
    --Hawthorne.

  4. The delicate, powdery coating upon certain growing or newly-gathered fruits or leaves, as on grapes, plums, etc. Hence: Anything giving an appearance of attractive freshness; a flush; a glow.

    A new, fresh, brilliant world, with all the bloom upon it.
    --Thackeray.

  5. The clouded appearance which varnish sometimes takes upon the surface of a picture.

  6. A yellowish deposit or powdery coating which appears on well-tanned leather.
    --Knight.

  7. (Min.) A popular term for a bright-hued variety of some minerals; as, the rose-red cobalt bloom.

Bloom

Bloom \Bloom\, n. [AS. bl?ma a mass or lump, [=i]senes bl?ma a lump or wedge of iron.] (Metal.)

  1. A mass of wrought iron from the Catalan forge or from the puddling furnace, deprived of its dross, and shaped usually in the form of an oblong block by shingling.

  2. A large bar of steel formed directly from an ingot by hammering or rolling, being a preliminary shape for further working.

Wiktionary

bloom

Etymology 1 n. 1 A blossom; the flower of a plant; an expanded bud. 2 Flowers, collectively. 3 (context uncountable English) The opening of flowers in general; the state of blossoming or of having the flowers open. 4 A state or time of beauty, freshness, and vigor/vigour; an opening to higher perfection, analogous to that of buds into blossoms. 5 The delicate, powdery coating upon certain growing or newly-gathered fruits or leaves, as on grapes, plums, etc. 6 Anything giving an appearance of attractive freshness. 7 The clouded appearance which varnish sometimes takes upon the surface of a picture. 8 A yellowish deposit or powdery coating which appears on well-tanned leather. 9 (context mineralogy English) A popular term for a bright-hued variety of some minerals. 10 A white area of cocoa butter that forms on the surface of chocolate when warmed and cooled. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context transitive English) To cause to blossom; to make flourish. 2 (context transitive English) To bestow a bloom upon; to make blooming or radiant. 3 (context intransitive English) Of a plant, to produce blooms; to open its blooms. 4 (context intransitive figuratively English) Of a person, business, etc, to flourish; to be in a state of healthful, growing youth and vigour; to show beauty and freshness. Etymology 3

n. The spongy mass of metal formed in a furnace by the smelting process.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bloom

"blossom of a plant," c.1200, a northern word, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse blomi "flower, blossom," also collectively "flowers and foliage on trees;" from Proto-Germanic *blomon (cognates: Old Saxon blomo, Middle Dutch bloeme, Dutch bloem, Old High German bluomo, German Blume, Gothic bloma), from PIE *bhle- (cognates: Old Irish blath "blossom, flower," Latin flos "flower," florere "to blossom, flourish"), extended form of root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom" (see folio). Related to Old English blowan "to flower" (see blow (v.2)).\n

\nTransferred sense, of persons, is from c.1300; meaning "state of greatest loveliness" is from early 14c.; that of "blush on the cheeks" is from 1752. Old English had cognate bloma, but only in the figurative sense of "state of greatest beauty;" the main word in Old English for "flower" was blostm (see blossom).

bloom

"rough mass of wrought iron," from Old English bloma "lump of metal; mass," which is of unknown origin. Identical in form to bloom (n.1), and sometimes regarded as a secondary sense of it, but evidence of a connection is wanting.

bloom

mid-13c., blomen, from the noun (see bloom (n.1)). Related: Bloomed; blooming.

WordNet

bloom

v. produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed" [syn: blossom, flower]

bloom

  1. n. the organic process of bearing flowers; "you will stop all bloom if you let the flowers go to seed" [syn: blooming]

  2. reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts [syn: flower, blossom]

  3. the best time of youth [syn: bloom of youth, salad days]

  4. a rosy color (especially in the cheeks) taken as a sign of good health [syn: blush, flush, rosiness]

  5. the period of greatest prosperity or productivity [syn: flower, prime, peak, heyday, blossom, efflorescence, flush]

  6. a powdery deposit on a surface [syn: efflorescence]

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "bloom".

The chamber was alive with plants and blooming flowers, colors and varieties Gilwyn had never seen.

Buckeye trees were in full pink bloom, and wildflowers and white anise grew along the sides of the road.

She gazed at him with new approval when she stopped, the lush, responsive tissues of her dark face turning darker still and blooming somnolently with a swelling and beautifying infusion of blood.

The flowers of this Bedstraw bloom towards August, about the time of the Feast of the Annunciation, and a legend says they first burst into blossom at the birth of our Saviour.

If Bernard was blooming, his bloom at this juncture must have deepened, and in so doing indeed have contributed an even brighter tint to his expression of salubrious happiness.

The small-branched shrub bears globular, wax-like flowers, and black berries, which are covered, when quite fresh, with a grey bloom.

In May and June it attracts attention by its bright green feathery foliage set off by cream-coloured bloom, whilst in September it bears a brilliant fruitage of berries, richly orange in colour at first, but presently of a clear ripe vermilion.

This was to be another version of their everlasting billiards competition and Bloom was going to win.

Stephen rejoined Mr Bloom who, with his practised eye, was not without perceiving that he had succumbed to the blandiloquence of the other parasite.

Once upon a time there was a destitute widow who lived in a ramshackle house with her two children named Snow White and Rose Red for the flowers that bloomed on the rosebushes in the yard, the flowers that bloomed, the flowers that bloom in the spring, tra-la.

Since 1880 I have sown seed ripened on plants that were bloomed for indoor decoration, it being ready about February.

I have also tried it in pots, grown and bloomed under the shade of a trellised peach tree, in a small house, without artificial heat, where it not only did well, but vied with the violets for effectiveness.

The ghost of his head bloomed through his nostrils, its mouth open, howling static.

Scorned by the One God of whose son he was begotten, Elua trod with bare feet on the bosom of his mother Earth and wandered singing, and where he went, flowers bloomed in his footprints.

Only a few early flowers bloomed, intrepid and pale, but there was a warble of birdsong, giving promise of summer to come.