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Bleed (comics)

The Bleed is a fictional interdimensional realm, a comic book construct that appears in books published by DC Comics. It first appeared in Stormwatch (vol. 2) #7 (May 1998), and was created by Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch.

Bleed (film)

Bleed (previously titled The Murder Club) is a 2002 horror film starring Debbie Rochon, Danny Wolske, Brinke Stevens, Julie Strain, Lloyd Kaufman, Orly Tepper, Ronnie Gene Blevins and Allen Nabors. Directed by Dennis Petersen and Devin Hamilton.

Bleed (Angel Dust album)

Bleed is the fourth studio album by German heavy metal band Angel Dust, released in 1999. The band took a slightly darker direction on the album, without losing the power metal melodies they explored with their previous studio album, Border of Reality.

Bleed (printing)

In printing, bleed is printing that goes beyond the edge of the sheet before trimming. In other words, the bleed is the area to be trimmed off. The bleed is the part on the side of a document that gives the printer a small amount of space to account for movement of the paper, and design inconsistencies. Artwork and background colors can extend into the bleed area. After trimming, the bleed ensures that no unprinted edges occur in the final trimmed document.

It is very difficult to print exactly to the edge of a sheet of paper/card so, to achieve this, it is necessary to print a slightly larger area than is needed and then trim the paper/card down to the required finished size. Images, background images and fills which are intended to extend to the edge of the page must be extended beyond the trim line to give a bleed.

Bleeds in the US generally are 1/8 of an inch from where the cut is to be made. Bleeds in the UK and Europe generally are 2 to 5mm from where the cut is to be made. This can vary from one print company to another. Some printers ask for specific sizes; most of these companies place the specific demands on their website or offer templates that are already set to their required bleed settings.

Bleed (Hot Chelle Rae song)

"Bleed" is a song by American pop rock band Hot Chelle Rae. It was released as the second single from their first studio album Lovesick Electric on August 3, 2010. The song peaked at number 31 on the US Mainstream Top 40.

Bleed (video game)

Bleed is an action-oriented platform video game developed by Bootdisk Revolution. The game was originally released for Xbox Live Indie Games on December 12, 2012. Bleed was later released for Windows and OS X on February 22, 2013 through Desura and the developer’s website, and through Steam on July 3, 2013.

Bleed (Soulfly song)

"Bleed" is the third single by metal band Soulfly, released in 1998 from the self-titled album Soulfly. Limp Bizkit guest members Fred Durst and DJ Lethal sing this song about pain, lying and madness with lyrics written by Durst and Max Cavalera. This song tributes Cavalera for the untimely death of his stepson Dana.

"Bleed" has the first music video released by Soulfly. Scenes include a fight including strangling, guest singer Durst jumped, and driving with shattered windshield on the driver side of a car.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bleed

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bleed/freeze/burn/starve to death
▪ Thousands of people are starving to death.
bleeding heart
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
death
▪ He bled to death in 15 minutes.
▪ In real life, Selena ran out of that motel room with a bullet wound, and bled to death.
▪ He quickly bled to death from the injury.
▪ Not, miraculously, through any major blood vessels, or I would by now have bled internally to death.
▪ Losing a leg to a shell, he quickly bled to death.
▪ Within minutes she had bled to death.
▪ He cut his wrists and bled to death.
heart
▪ They roll grenades down floors of cinemas and blow up women and kids: does your heart bleed about that, Trevor?
man
▪ But a man who bled was vulnerable, and a wound caused by a mouse-trap showed a reassuring degree of incompetence.
nose
▪ My nose started to bleed and my eyes streamed with water.
▪ His nose had bled and his forehead and face were badly bruised from his fall; but he was not seriously hurt.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Between us, we killed three of them, but a bullet hit my finger and it began to bleed.
▪ He hits him again and the bull begins to bleed from his ears.
▪ Moreover, my finger-tips began to bleed.
▪ Two months into that pregnancy, so the story goes, she began to bleed.
start
▪ I started to bleed down there but it's stopped now.
▪ And after about three days, I was in terrible pain and started to bleed a lot.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
my heart bleeds (for sb)
▪ "He says he can't come out tonight because he has to look after the kids." "My heart bleeds! That must be the first time he's stayed in with them since they were born!"
▪ My heart bleeds for those poor children.
▪ You can't afford a third car? My heart bleeds!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A deep cut on her wrist was bleeding profusely.
▪ Marcia bled him for every penny he had.
▪ The brake line had to be bled.
▪ The dark blue bled into the white of the shirt.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All the crews of the after guns were knocked over by the concussion, and bled from the nose or ears.
Wiktionary

bleed

n. 1 An incident of bleeding, as in haemophili

  1. 2 (context printing English) A narrow edge around a page layout, to be printed but cut off afterwards (added to allow for slight misalignment, especially with pictures that should run to the edge of the finished sheet). 3 (context sound recording English) The situation where sound is picked up by a microphone from a source other than that which is intended. v

  2. 1 (context intransitive of an animal English) To lose blood through an injured blood vessel. 2 (context transitive English) To let or draw blood from. 3 (context transitive English) To take large amounts of money from. 4 (context transitive English) To steadily lose (something vital). 5 (context intransitive of an ink or dye English) To spread from the intended location and stain the surrounding cloth or paper. 6 (context transitive English) To remove air bubbles from a pipe containing fluids. 7 (context obsolete transitive English) To bleed on; to make bloody. 8 (context intransitive copulative English) To show one's group loyalty by showing (its associated color) in one's blood. 9 To lose sap, gum, or juice. 10 To issue forth, or drop, like blood from an incision. 11 (context phonology transitive of a phonological rule English) To destroy the environment where another phonological rule would have applied.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Bleed

Bleed \Bleed\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bled; p. pr. & vb. n. Bleeding.] [OE. bleden, AS. bl?dan, fr. bl?d blood; akin to Sw. bl["o]da, Dan. bl["o]de, D. bloeden, G. bluten. See Blood.]

  1. To emit blood; to lose blood; to run with blood, by whatever means; as, the arm bleeds; the wound bled freely; to bleed at the nose.

  2. To withdraw blood from the body; to let blood; as, Dr. A. bleeds in fevers.

  3. To lose or shed one's blood, as in case of a violent death or severe wounds; to die by violence. ``C[ae]sar must bleed.''
    --Shak.

    The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day.
    --Pope.

  4. To issue forth, or drop, as blood from an incision.

    For me the balm shall bleed.
    --Pope.

  5. To lose sap, gum, or juice; as, a tree or a vine bleeds when tapped or wounded.

  6. To pay or lose money; to have money drawn or extorted; as, to bleed freely for a cause. [Colloq.]

    To make the heart bleed, to cause extreme pain, as from sympathy or pity.

Bleed

Bleed \Bleed\, v. t.

  1. To let blood from; to take or draw blood from, as by opening a vein.

  2. To lose, as blood; to emit or let drop, as sap.

    A decaying pine of stately size, bleeding amber.
    --H. Miller.

  3. To draw money from (one); to induce to pay; as, they bled him freely for this fund. [Colloq.]

WordNet

bleed

  1. v. lose blood from one's body [syn: shed blood, hemorrhage]

  2. draw blood; "In the old days, doctors routinely bled patients as part of the treatment" [syn: leech, phlebotomize, phlebotomise]

  3. get or extort (money or other possessions) from someone; "They bled me dry--I have nothing left!"

  4. be diffused; "These dyes and colors are guaranteed not to run" [syn: run]

  5. drain of liquid or steam; "bleed the radiators"; "the mechanic bled the engine"

  6. [also: bled]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bleed

Old English bledan "to let blood," in Middle English and after, "to let blood from surgically;" also "to emit blood," from Proto-Germanic *blodjan "emit blood" (cognates: Old Norse blæða, German bluten), from *bhlo-to- "swell, gush, spurt" (see blood (n.)). Meaning "extort money from" is from 1670s. Of dyes or paints, from 1862. Related: Bled; bleeding.

Usage examples of "bleed".

In severe hemorrhages, this quantity should be administered every half hour, until the bleeding is checked.

I had adored Rosalie, and my heart still bled at the thought of our parting.

Was the unfortunate aeronaut slowly bleeding to death, lying there amidst the bushes on that tongue of land?

An Indin burial place had been disturbed, the earth was bleeding from the massacre of birds and gators, and the Mikasukis was afeared that bad spirits of their old enemies might be set loose.

The scar which my late amours had left was still bleeding, and I was glad to think that I should be able to restore the young Marseillaise to the paternal hearth without any painful partings or vain regrets.

Kathleen, had a bleeding capsular angioma removed in April of that same year.

He dreaded being sent back to the Tower even more than he dreaded a beating for stealing illegal passage on the Windship, but if he were allowed to remain in the city, would he not merely end up as a drudge, toiling in sunless chambers for the rest of his life, polishing aumbries, bleeding, broken?

As Yama approached the shrine, fluttering banderoles of all colors bled into the white light, as if it was a window that had turned toward a festival sky.

Knuckles dinged and bleeding, his clothes white, nose filled with plaster dust, he bashed a hole big enough, dropped the hammer and wriggled through, tearing his cape in the process.

I sighed and burned for her in silence, not daring to declare my love, for while the wound of the death of Charlotte was still bleeding I also began to find that women were beginning to give me the cold shoulder.

The Knight Gawain searches for the sword that beheaded John the Baptist, and which magically bleeds every day at noon.

Your bleeding highness with a bedful of bare bibb is His face twitched as a bright idea occurred to him.

Why did he pick at one of the cuts on his legs until it bled, then mix the blood and semen and bring some of it to his mouth, where its odd bleachy, metallic smell almost made him vomit once more?

Your country botcher would only bleed her, and she hasna the strength for that.

However much her heart might bleed over her losses, her vanity as an honest bourgeoise filled her with rebellious thoughts, for she could not admit that she had been in the wrong.