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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bite

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bit depressedBritish Englishspoken:
▪ I felt a bit depressed because I was so short of money.
a bit of a chatspoken BrE:
▪ Perhaps I could have a bit of a chat with him.
a bit of a cheek
▪ It’s a bit of a cheek, asking me for money.
a bit of a misunderstandingBritish English
▪ I’m afraid it’s all a bit of a misunderstanding.
a bite mark (=a mark where something has bitten you)
▪ Her arms were covered in itchy bite marks.
a bite to eat (=a small meal)
▪ We should have time for a bite to eat before we set out.
a bit/little scared
▪ I was always a little scared of my father.
a dog bites sb
▪ Their dog had bitten a little girl on the leg.
a fish bites (=it takes food from a hook and gets caught)
▪ The fish aren’t biting today.
a little/a bit nervous
▪ I was a little nervous before the interview.
a piece/bit of cheese
▪ Would you like a piece of cheese?
a piece/bit of chocolate
▪ Would you like a piece of chocolate?
a piece/bit of information (also an item of informationformal)
▪ He provided me with several useful pieces of information.
a snake bites sb
▪ I might get bitten by a snake.
a spider bites sb
▪ He was bitten by a tropical spider in a bunch of bananas.
an icy/biting/bitter wind (=very cold)
▪ She shivered in the icy wind.
an insect bite
▪ He was worried about a large red insect bite on his back.
be a bit of a blowBritish Englishespecially spoken (= be disappointing or cause problems for you)
▪ The result was a bit of a blow for the team.
be a bit of a gamble (=involve a small amount of risk)
▪ It was a bit of a gamble putting him on the field, but he played well.
be (a bit of a) minefield
▪ Dating can be a bit of a minefield.
be a bit of a myth (=be not really true)
▪ The whole story is a bit of a myth.
be a bit of a shockBritish Englishespecially spoken (= be a shock, but not very serious or unpleasant)
▪ I wasn’t expecting to win, so it was a bit of a shock.
be a bit of an exaggerationinformal (= be a slight exaggeration)
▪ It's a bit of an exaggeration to say he's handsome.
bit part
▪ He’s had bit parts in a couple of soaps.
bit player
▪ Although he was NRC chairman, Hervey was strictly a bit player in government.
bite into an apple
▪ Sue bit into her apple with a loud crunch.
bite your nails
▪ Eddie bit his nails nervously.
every bit as much as
▪ I loved him every bit as much as she did.
every last drop/bit/scrap etc (=all of something, including even the smallest amount of it)
▪ They made us pick up every last scrap of paper.
is a bit of a mess
▪ Sorry – the place is a bit of a mess.
I’m a bit shortBritish Englishspoken (= I haven’t got much money at the moment)
Let’s have a bit of hush
Let’s have a bit of hush, please, gentlemen.
love bite
nails...bitten to the quick
▪ Her nails were bitten to the quick.
savage/stinging/vicious/biting satire
▪ a biting satire of the television industry
see you in a bitBritish English (= see you soon)
sound bite
threepenny bit
tiny bit
▪ She always felt a tiny bit sad.
went a bit mad (=spent a lot of money)
▪ We went a bit mad and ordered champagne.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
back
▪ But the apple is biting back.
▪ Unfortunately, the very live bat bit back, and Osbourne underwent a painful series of precautionary rabies injections.
▪ So she bit back her explanation, even though she could not bring herself to respond to André's embrace.
▪ Her teeth sank into her bottom lip, biting back a cry, and she winced.
▪ But she bit back the words.
▪ And biting back ... the Whitesnake man plays it again.
▪ She had the insane desire to tell all that to this man, but she bit back the words.
▪ She bit back on her irritation.
deep
▪ The handcuffs bit deep into his wrist as Sullivan pulled at the fallen body beside him.
▪ Cherith's betrayal had bitten deep, then - deeper even than Folly had realised.
down
▪ He bit down on it, and the display began to supply proximity and ground contour information.
▪ She bit down on her garlic, which cracked coldly, like bamboo being sliced by a knife.
▪ She felt faint now, but for a very different reason, and she bit down hard on her lip.
▪ By bracing herself against the tree and biting down hard on her lip, she was able to struggle to her feet.
▪ The nails on the hand clutching the pen were bitten down to the quick - always a sign of savagery.
▪ Yeah, so I was just telling Mr Glover that the fish are biting down there this afternoon.
▪ She bit down on his lower lip, gently, just enough to excite and not enough to hurt.
▪ I put my arm over my mouth and bit down on it to keep from crying out.
hard
▪ Lily put her fist in her mouth and bit hard on her fingers.
▪ She twisted her mouth in a cry of sheer ecstasy and bit hard on her lip.
▪ Her teeth bit hard into her lower lip.
▪ The boy smiled faintly, and then bit hard on his lips and gnawed the smile away.
off
▪ My head had been bitten off.
▪ He just might bite off a finger or a nose or poke you in the ear.
▪ But what happened to me was that my head was bitten off almost literally.
▪ It must, instead, be bitten off like this: 1.
▪ Striped in a tiger mask, he feinted across the counter at Melanie; she bit off an exclamation.
▪ The last thing he did was bite off the little finger of her left hand.
▪ Council members took jabs and butted heads and bit off ears, figuratively speaking.
▪ The 435 members of the House each are expected to bite off a specialty and run with it.
once
Once bitten and the bite had gone deeper, he now knew, than he had ever appreciated.
■ NOUN
bug
▪ It was then that the drama bug had bitten.
▪ The bug had even bitten the hawkers.
▪ The collecting bug often bites early.
▪ It felt cool and astringent but the bugs kept biting.
bullet
▪ In the February issue I warned you that I was going to bite the bullet and buy a real computer.
▪ You see, as Job Survivor I am sweating bullets by night, biting bullets by day.
▪ If the Socialists win the election, they too will have to bite the bullet.
▪ It means Labour biting the bullet.
▪ Shouldn't we bite the bullet now and legislate, as many are suggesting?
▪ When fate marks you down for immortality you'd just better bite the bullet and lace your boots up tight.
dust
▪ The finale of Unforgiven is as much a tragedy for the survivors as for those who bite the dust.
▪ Another good restaurant bites the dust -- end of story, right?
▪ So what are you going to do, now that your favourite C64 action mag has bitten the dust?
▪ They bite the dust with lead in their bellies.
hand
▪ Somehow, without guidance and peer influence, cricketers are apt to bite the hand that feeds them.
▪ The third woman went to pull a weed in her front yard and a rattler bit her hand.
▪ The studs bit into Trent's hand.
▪ This appears to be a new version of biting the hand that feeds you.
▪ He bit him in the hand.
▪ It is hard to bite the hand that feeds you.
▪ Should they then turn around to bite the hand that takes down their volunteered confessions, they will fail.
▪ Why does a cat sometimes bite the hand that strokes it?
head
▪ This Katherine bites the heads off rag-dolls and threatens her sister Bianca with a pair of pinking shears.
▪ He had no right to bite the head off one of his staunchest friends.
▪ You could trust him not to take the mickey, or to turn round and bite your head off.
▪ A geek is a carnival performer who bites the heads off live chickens and snakes.
▪ Just to bite their heads off.
▪ His ankles are reddened by sand-flea bites, his head has been shorn to indicate his reduction in status.
▪ I could have bitten her head off.
▪ Not two minutes in his company and she was biting his head off.
lip
▪ Now she stopped, biting her lip.
▪ She was biting her lower lip.
▪ Emily bit her lip, the girl was obviously in touch with Craig, perhaps they were even living in the same house.
▪ She bit her lip over the length, but there was little she could do about it.
▪ She bound her brows and bit her lower lip and generally carried on like some one with serious constipation.
▪ She bit on her lip, an exquisite agony tearing her apart.
▪ Dinah bit her lips, to keep from screaming.
▪ Peach bit her lip, feeling the sweat trickle down the back of her shirt.
mosquito
▪ We lived in the bush, drank muddy water, were bitten by mosquitoes.
▪ Dear Madam: I have your claim for $ 5. 00 for having been bitten by a mosquito on our train.
▪ People living near Lambarene can be bitten by infected mosquitoes as often as 100 times a night.
▪ Humans contract the disease when bitten by mosquitoes that have been infected by primates.
▪ Through that hot and humid night, he was bitten by mosquitoes and nipped by rats.
nail
▪ His nails were bitten to the quicks.
▪ Lissa's nails bit convulsively into her palms.
▪ He thrust his face into hers, forcing her to breathe his rancid breath; his untrimmed nails bit into her arms.
▪ Her hands were small and her nails were bitten and short.
▪ Quiet, reserved, with finger nails bitten down to the quick, Jim stood just five foot six inches tall.
piece
▪ If you then hold food near its mouth, it will bite off pieces and swallow them.
recession
▪ Their worst patch was in 1989 and 1990, before recession really bit.
▪ The recession may be biting in our own larders.
▪ Hard-up families in the stockbroker belt are begging state schools to bail them out as the recession bites deeper.
▪ Trafalgar shares have slumped from a peak of £3.96 three years ago as the recession has bitten into profits.
snake
▪ They turn into snakes and bite each other.
▪ They knew, and he knew, that when that snake bit YOu, you died.
sound
▪ I was thinking back to famous historical sound bites.
▪ Great inaugural speeches generally have one memorable sound bite.
▪ It was hardly the stuff of which sound bites are made.
▪ The issue is too complicated for honest sound bites anyway.
tongue
▪ He's not and would be wise to bite his tongue.
▪ He wished with all his soul that he had bitten his tongue instead.
▪ Polly battled on, practically biting her tongue in half.
▪ Tell them to bite their tongues.
▪ Whatever the reason, Dauntless bit his tongue and resolved to put up with Cleo Sinister.
▪ Ivan Yerineev was thrown to the ground and bit off his tongue.
▪ She could have bitten off her impulsive tongue.
▪ But they want a pink one, so Ralph takes out a pink one, bites his tongue.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Yet as constraints on funding begin to bite a new dynamic is becoming apparent.
▪ Charlea burst not into tears but began to bite her lip and soon broke out into gales of laughter.
▪ Next came his three younger sisters whom he began to terrorise - biting, kicking and scratching them.
▪ When his stepfather, Douglas Reynolds, intervened, Campbell began biting Reynolds' face, police said.
▪ I had to paint the gashes as soon as possible so that rust would not begin to bite into Wavebreaker's long sleekness.
▪ Once the constraints on local authority capital expenditure began to bite it cooperated with private housing development on inner-area sites.
▪ This increase occurred after the 1996 Asylum and Immigration Act, which denied refugees access to social housing, began to bite.
start
▪ Babies start to bite and chew about half-way through their first year.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(a bit of) a mouthful
(it's) a bit thick
(just) that little bit better/easier etc
▪ We have put together a few of the most popular itineraries to help make your choice that little bit easier.
a bit
▪ 'Are you coming?' 'Yes, in a bit.'
▪ After a bit, Bill had started to tire of her company.
▪ Do you mind looking after the kids for a bit while I go out?
▪ Enrollment is down a bit from last year.
▪ I'm feeling a bit better
▪ I sat down, and after a bit, the phone rang.
▪ I think I'll lie down for a bit.
▪ I waited, and a bit later the phone went again -- it was Bill.
▪ Oh, wait a bit, can't you?
▪ Prices have dropped a bit in the last few days.
▪ Wait a bit, I've nearly finished.
a bit
a bit
a bit of a lad
a bit of a sth
▪ Got a bit of tidying Up to do.
▪ Her desired outcome was a bit of money to help with major structural repairs.
▪ People like to see a bit of bellowing in a king.
▪ Saare remembers one student who did not do well academically and was a bit of a troublemaker.
▪ That would be a bit of a lie.
▪ Warren is from an upper middleclass Connecticut family; he's a bit of a snob.
▪ What is needed, perhaps, is a bit of disgraceful degradation of the sort that nobody can ignore.
a bit of how's your father
a bit of hush
a bit of rough
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
a bit of rough
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
a bit of skirt
a bit of stuff/fluff/skirt
a fair size/amount/number/bit/distance etc
▪ But a fair number of them went on to greater things.
▪ It prefers a fair amount of nutritious detritus.
▪ Scientists must proceed cautiously, moving ahead only with the assent of a fair number of their colleagues.
▪ Thanks to the inherently leaky nature of the water industry, there is already a fair amount of information to go on.
▪ That involved a fair amount of travel.
▪ There was a fair amount going on.
▪ They'd have a fair bit of tidying up to do before they left.
▪ You may also be involved in a fair amount of travel.
a little bit
▪ He was even maybe a little bit relieved, because immediately it was clear that Ernie was what she needed.
▪ I prefer to talk a little bit.
▪ I really just did it for a little bit, and then gave it up.
▪ There was, I suspect, a little bit of Otago isolationism involved.
a wee bit
▪ Don't you think her behavior is just a wee bit bizarre?
▪ As for the holiday, I agree with you, it sounds a wee bit unlikely.
▪ He is hapless, passive and maybe just a wee bit smug.
▪ It is a wee bit disconcerting when you can hear yourself think in a pub these days.
▪ Monica is a wee bit overweight.
▪ Reason I ask, Mr Rasmussen says you seemed a wee bit tipsy.
▪ There is no label on the bottle, it tastes a wee bit vinegary.
▪ We have been lacking a wee bit of professionalism recently.
▪ You might be just a wee bit too clever for your own good now.
a/one bit at a time
▪ The text can be put on an overhead and revealed a bit at a time.
be a bit much
▪ But maybe total understanding of everything is a bit much to ask of a tiny human mind.
▪ But seeing the little fellow lying there in sauce, sauteed, was a bit much.
▪ But to rise from the grave was a bit much even for Nixon.
be a bit much/be too much
be a bit of all right
bit by bit
Bit by bit, our apartment started to look like a home.
▪ But then, slowly, bit by bit, year by year, I began to change my mind.
▪ In therapy, we chip away at this, bit by bit.
▪ Make a small cut and then try to pull the gall to pieces bit by bit.
▪ So bit by bit you're being written into the programme and fed into the computer.
▪ The experiment faltered bit by bit.
▪ The information only came out bit by bit since she's still not easy in her mind about talking to us.
▪ Thus, bit by bit, the child learns to string together more complicated sequences.
▪ You can shop meal by meal, or bit by bit.
bit on the side
▪ Her husband's reaction to Lowell's bit on the side had been subdued.
bite your tongue
▪ Always ready to knock on wood, throw salt over my shoulder, bite my tongue, cross my fingers.
▪ But they want a pink one, so Ralph takes out a pink one, bites his tongue.
▪ He's not and would be wise to bite his tongue.
▪ It's all very well telling some one to bite their tongue and not fight back.
▪ Polly battled on, practically biting her tongue in half.
▪ Tell them to bite their tongues.
▪ Whatever the reason, Dauntless bit his tongue and resolved to put up with Cleo Sinister.
bite/snap sb's head off
▪ A geek is a carnival performer who bites the heads off live chickens and snakes.
▪ He had no right to bite the head off one of his staunchest friends.
▪ I could have bitten her head off.
▪ Just to bite their heads off.
▪ Not two minutes in his company and she was biting his head off.
▪ The gusts are becoming malevolent, snapping the heads off the waves like daisies.
▪ This Katherine bites the heads off rag-dolls and threatens her sister Bianca with a pair of pinking shears.
▪ You could trust him not to take the mickey, or to turn round and bite your head off.
do your bit
▪ I've done my bit - now it's up to you.
▪ We wanted to do our bit for the boys fighting in the war.
▪ Don't you want to do your bit towards stamping it out?
▪ Eva and several of the cadets from overseas were put in the West End brigade to do their bit.
▪ Help is desperately needed - and rugby friends can do their bit.
▪ I hope that you can all do your bit.
▪ Let Africanized bees do their bit to breed better beekeepers in this country, in other words.
▪ Nature did its bit as well.
▪ Now I am not unpatriotic, and I want to do my bit in this great movement.
▪ Stonehenge has gone, so I reckon I can do me bit of growing up at Skipton Hall.
every bit as good/important etc
▪ Barbara was every bit as good as she sounded.
▪ Here, the Fund runs many family projects that are less well-known but doing work that is every bit as important.
▪ If you looked through a microscope you could see that they had cheekbones every bit as good as Hope Steadman's.
▪ In terms of predicting and controlling the social environment, high technology can quite clearly be every bit as important as brute force.
▪ It is for this reason that good balanced design is every bit as important as meticulous craftsmanship.
▪ It takes no more than five minutes and tastes every bit as good at the oven-baked variety.
▪ The explanation is every bit as important as the numbers!
every bit as important/bad/good etc
▪ Barbara was every bit as good as she sounded.
▪ Here, the Fund runs many family projects that are less well-known but doing work that is every bit as important.
▪ It is for this reason that good balanced design is every bit as important as meticulous craftsmanship.
▪ It takes no more than five minutes and tastes every bit as good at the oven-baked variety.
▪ The explanation is every bit as important as the numbers!
▪ The traffic was every bit as bad as had been predicted.
▪ Things every bit as bad happen there, too.
▪ To her horror it was every bit as bad as she'd feared, and possibly even a tiny bit worse.
get the bit between your teeth
it's (a little/bit) late in the day (to do sth)
not a bit/not one bit
not make a blind bit of difference
not take/pay a blind bit of notice
▪ For six years, the Government have not taken a blind bit of notice of the Audit Commission's report.
not the least/not in the least/not the least bit
once bitten, twice shy
quite a bit
▪ He owes me quite a bit of money.
▪ Jim has improved quite a bit since he came home from the hospital.
▪ She's quite a bit shorter than I remembered.
▪ She said she learned quite a bit.
▪ The estimates were a fair bit higher than what the final figure was.
▪ We've had quite a bit of snow this year so far.
▪ Alongside me was Sam Ratcliffe who, at the tender age of sixteen, had already had quite a bit of publicity.
▪ But it's already created quite a bit of controversy.
▪ It gives me hours of pleasurable reading and quite a bit of envious longing for things I can not afford.
▪ My grandson was over today and they played together quite a bit.
▪ That had generated quite a bit of business.
▪ The most noticeable change was in my brother, who had grown quite a bit and was now a third-grader.
▪ There's quite a bit of noise coming from the kitchens.
▪ There was quite a bit of war in the delta, so, some-times, sure.
quite a lot/bit/few
▪ A better day today, Miss Lavant wrote in her diary, quite a bit of sunshine.
▪ By no means, Watson; even now quite a few scientists continue to doubt.
▪ I lived quite a lot of my early childhood at the Thompsons' house behind a shop on Harehills Parade.
▪ Obviously, you have to wear quite a lot of protective clothing to minimise the risk of getting injured.
▪ Over 296 pages, Fallows cites quite a few.
▪ The man looks prosperous, like quite a few men.
▪ There's quite a bit of noise coming from the kitchens.
▪ There has been quite a lot of talk recently about adding enzymes to help the carp digest our sophisticated carp baits.
sb's bark is worse than their bite
take a bit of doing/explaining etc
▪ It took a bit of doing - for instance, the disposal site had to check out 100 percent.
▪ It took a bit of explaining.
▪ That's going to take a bit of explaining.
the hair of the dog (that bit you)
with (any) luck/with a bit of luck
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Barry bit the corner of the packet to open it.
▪ Don't worry about the dog - he won't bite.
▪ Even a friendly dog will bite if it's scared.
▪ I sometimes bite my fingernails when I'm nervous.
▪ On just the second day of the trip, I was bitten on the leg by a snake.
▪ She fought off her attacker, scratching and biting him.
▪ She was bitten by a rattlesnake.
▪ Taryn, stop biting your fingernails!
▪ The company withdraws its new products quickly if consumers fail to bite.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A shell tore through his back, shattering his shoulder and collarbone and biting into his spine.
▪ Closed basins as deep as 135 feet were bitten out of the underlying basalt.
▪ Cook noodles in medium pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite.
▪ It chews and bites the venom into its victims, generally small mammals and birds.
▪ Not two minutes in his company and she was biting his head off.
▪ The workers were not scratched or bitten and have not been placed under quarantine.
▪ This Katherine bites the heads off rag-dolls and threatens her sister Bianca with a pair of pinking shears.
▪ When he got to his feet again McAteer grabbed him and bit half his ear off.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ I took a big bite, put it back on the table and left it to rot throughout the night.
▪ But coyotes are taking the biggest bite out of sheep farming in Northern California.
▪ Voice over Unlike Jackie, Bouncer's bark was probably bigger than his bite.
▪ Buying school supplies, she said, took a big bite out of her allowance.
▪ Profits of the Bisto-to-Mr-Kipling-cakes giant have nose-dived from £150m to just over £92m with big bites taken out of both bread and cakes.
▪ Then he takes a big bite of it.
▪ If that is the case you need to take bigger bites or steps.
■ NOUN
bug
▪ They sleep six to a bed and wake up to the fiery sting of bug bites.
mark
▪ But small or not, it appears to have left a nasty bite mark on her arm.
▪ I examined closely where the squirrel had bitten the branches, and found the bite marks in the thin bark.
▪ Broadly speaking, children under four are not sensitised and show no bite mark.
▪ I found these seemingly senseless bite marks by the hundreds.
▪ On 11 May 1991 he was taken to hospital suffering from 18 bruises and a bite mark.
▪ He left a dozen ugly bite marks on her back.
mosquito
▪ She found a spot on Nowak's calf that was red and swollen like a severe mosquito bite.
▪ The mosquito bite on his leg had swollen into a scarlet hillock.
snake
▪ Human deaths from snake bites are caused mainly by accident.
▪ In his magazine, he published formulas for animal manures and prescriptions for the cure of snake bites and malaria.
▪ Opposite A prairie rattler. Snake bites cause the death of over 100,000 people every year.
▪ I sent him back to the Patel farm with his snake bite and his elaborate complaints.
■ VERB
take
▪ This oarsman says it took a bite out of his blade.
▪ Already emaciated, he would take only occasional bites of food and seemed to shake violently when he drank fluids.
▪ If there was no numbing and if the item was reasonably palatable, then they'd take another small bite and swallow.
▪ They ate at whim, taking a bite here, a bite there.
▪ I took a bite out of the sandwich.
▪ But coyotes are taking the biggest bite out of sheep farming in Northern California.
▪ You know, the one that takes a healthy bite from your paycheck day after day, year after year?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(a bit of) a mouthful
(it's) a bit thick
(just) that little bit better/easier etc
▪ We have put together a few of the most popular itineraries to help make your choice that little bit easier.
a bit
▪ 'Are you coming?' 'Yes, in a bit.'
▪ After a bit, Bill had started to tire of her company.
▪ Do you mind looking after the kids for a bit while I go out?
▪ Enrollment is down a bit from last year.
▪ I'm feeling a bit better
▪ I sat down, and after a bit, the phone rang.
▪ I think I'll lie down for a bit.
▪ I waited, and a bit later the phone went again -- it was Bill.
▪ Oh, wait a bit, can't you?
▪ Prices have dropped a bit in the last few days.
▪ Wait a bit, I've nearly finished.
a bit
a bit
a bit of a lad
a bit of a sth
▪ Got a bit of tidying Up to do.
▪ Her desired outcome was a bit of money to help with major structural repairs.
▪ People like to see a bit of bellowing in a king.
▪ Saare remembers one student who did not do well academically and was a bit of a troublemaker.
▪ That would be a bit of a lie.
▪ Warren is from an upper middleclass Connecticut family; he's a bit of a snob.
▪ What is needed, perhaps, is a bit of disgraceful degradation of the sort that nobody can ignore.
a bit of how's your father
a bit of hush
a bit of rough
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
a bit of rough
▪ At the moment it looks more like a bit of rough pasture ... full of dandelions and clover patches.
a bit of skirt
a bit of stuff/fluff/skirt
a fair size/amount/number/bit/distance etc
▪ But a fair number of them went on to greater things.
▪ It prefers a fair amount of nutritious detritus.
▪ Scientists must proceed cautiously, moving ahead only with the assent of a fair number of their colleagues.
▪ Thanks to the inherently leaky nature of the water industry, there is already a fair amount of information to go on.
▪ That involved a fair amount of travel.
▪ There was a fair amount going on.
▪ They'd have a fair bit of tidying up to do before they left.
▪ You may also be involved in a fair amount of travel.
a little bit
▪ He was even maybe a little bit relieved, because immediately it was clear that Ernie was what she needed.
▪ I prefer to talk a little bit.
▪ I really just did it for a little bit, and then gave it up.
▪ There was, I suspect, a little bit of Otago isolationism involved.
a wee bit
▪ Don't you think her behavior is just a wee bit bizarre?
▪ As for the holiday, I agree with you, it sounds a wee bit unlikely.
▪ He is hapless, passive and maybe just a wee bit smug.
▪ It is a wee bit disconcerting when you can hear yourself think in a pub these days.
▪ Monica is a wee bit overweight.
▪ Reason I ask, Mr Rasmussen says you seemed a wee bit tipsy.
▪ There is no label on the bottle, it tastes a wee bit vinegary.
▪ We have been lacking a wee bit of professionalism recently.
▪ You might be just a wee bit too clever for your own good now.
a/one bit at a time
▪ The text can be put on an overhead and revealed a bit at a time.
be a bit much
▪ But maybe total understanding of everything is a bit much to ask of a tiny human mind.
▪ But seeing the little fellow lying there in sauce, sauteed, was a bit much.
▪ But to rise from the grave was a bit much even for Nixon.
be a bit much/be too much
be a bit of all right
be champing at the bit
▪ David is champing at the bit.
▪ Within three months Eva was champing at the bit.
bit by bit
Bit by bit, our apartment started to look like a home.
▪ But then, slowly, bit by bit, year by year, I began to change my mind.
▪ In therapy, we chip away at this, bit by bit.
▪ Make a small cut and then try to pull the gall to pieces bit by bit.
▪ So bit by bit you're being written into the programme and fed into the computer.
▪ The experiment faltered bit by bit.
▪ The information only came out bit by bit since she's still not easy in her mind about talking to us.
▪ Thus, bit by bit, the child learns to string together more complicated sequences.
▪ You can shop meal by meal, or bit by bit.
bit on the side
▪ Her husband's reaction to Lowell's bit on the side had been subdued.
bite your tongue
▪ Always ready to knock on wood, throw salt over my shoulder, bite my tongue, cross my fingers.
▪ But they want a pink one, so Ralph takes out a pink one, bites his tongue.
▪ He's not and would be wise to bite his tongue.
▪ It's all very well telling some one to bite their tongue and not fight back.
▪ Polly battled on, practically biting her tongue in half.
▪ Tell them to bite their tongues.
▪ Whatever the reason, Dauntless bit his tongue and resolved to put up with Cleo Sinister.
bite/snap sb's head off
▪ A geek is a carnival performer who bites the heads off live chickens and snakes.
▪ He had no right to bite the head off one of his staunchest friends.
▪ I could have bitten her head off.
▪ Just to bite their heads off.
▪ Not two minutes in his company and she was biting his head off.
▪ The gusts are becoming malevolent, snapping the heads off the waves like daisies.
▪ This Katherine bites the heads off rag-dolls and threatens her sister Bianca with a pair of pinking shears.
▪ You could trust him not to take the mickey, or to turn round and bite your head off.
do your bit
▪ I've done my bit - now it's up to you.
▪ We wanted to do our bit for the boys fighting in the war.
▪ Don't you want to do your bit towards stamping it out?
▪ Eva and several of the cadets from overseas were put in the West End brigade to do their bit.
▪ Help is desperately needed - and rugby friends can do their bit.
▪ I hope that you can all do your bit.
▪ Let Africanized bees do their bit to breed better beekeepers in this country, in other words.
▪ Nature did its bit as well.
▪ Now I am not unpatriotic, and I want to do my bit in this great movement.
▪ Stonehenge has gone, so I reckon I can do me bit of growing up at Skipton Hall.
every bit as good/important etc
▪ Barbara was every bit as good as she sounded.
▪ Here, the Fund runs many family projects that are less well-known but doing work that is every bit as important.
▪ If you looked through a microscope you could see that they had cheekbones every bit as good as Hope Steadman's.
▪ In terms of predicting and controlling the social environment, high technology can quite clearly be every bit as important as brute force.
▪ It is for this reason that good balanced design is every bit as important as meticulous craftsmanship.
▪ It takes no more than five minutes and tastes every bit as good at the oven-baked variety.
▪ The explanation is every bit as important as the numbers!
every bit as important/bad/good etc
▪ Barbara was every bit as good as she sounded.
▪ Here, the Fund runs many family projects that are less well-known but doing work that is every bit as important.
▪ It is for this reason that good balanced design is every bit as important as meticulous craftsmanship.
▪ It takes no more than five minutes and tastes every bit as good at the oven-baked variety.
▪ The explanation is every bit as important as the numbers!
▪ The traffic was every bit as bad as had been predicted.
▪ Things every bit as bad happen there, too.
▪ To her horror it was every bit as bad as she'd feared, and possibly even a tiny bit worse.
get the bit between your teeth
it's (a little/bit) late in the day (to do sth)
not a bit/not one bit
not make a blind bit of difference
not take/pay a blind bit of notice
▪ For six years, the Government have not taken a blind bit of notice of the Audit Commission's report.
not the least/not in the least/not the least bit
once bitten, twice shy
quite a bit
▪ He owes me quite a bit of money.
▪ Jim has improved quite a bit since he came home from the hospital.
▪ She's quite a bit shorter than I remembered.
▪ She said she learned quite a bit.
▪ The estimates were a fair bit higher than what the final figure was.
▪ We've had quite a bit of snow this year so far.
▪ Alongside me was Sam Ratcliffe who, at the tender age of sixteen, had already had quite a bit of publicity.
▪ But it's already created quite a bit of controversy.
▪ It gives me hours of pleasurable reading and quite a bit of envious longing for things I can not afford.
▪ My grandson was over today and they played together quite a bit.
▪ That had generated quite a bit of business.
▪ The most noticeable change was in my brother, who had grown quite a bit and was now a third-grader.
▪ There's quite a bit of noise coming from the kitchens.
▪ There was quite a bit of war in the delta, so, some-times, sure.
quite a lot/bit/few
▪ A better day today, Miss Lavant wrote in her diary, quite a bit of sunshine.
▪ By no means, Watson; even now quite a few scientists continue to doubt.
▪ I lived quite a lot of my early childhood at the Thompsons' house behind a shop on Harehills Parade.
▪ Obviously, you have to wear quite a lot of protective clothing to minimise the risk of getting injured.
▪ Over 296 pages, Fallows cites quite a few.
▪ The man looks prosperous, like quite a few men.
▪ There's quite a bit of noise coming from the kitchens.
▪ There has been quite a lot of talk recently about adding enzymes to help the carp digest our sophisticated carp baits.
sb's bark is worse than their bite
take a bit of doing/explaining etc
▪ It took a bit of doing - for instance, the disposal site had to check out 100 percent.
▪ It took a bit of explaining.
▪ That's going to take a bit of explaining.
the hair of the dog (that bit you)
with (any) luck/with a bit of luck
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a protest song with bite and wit
▪ After two bites I realised the apple was rotten.
▪ Animal bites should be treated immediately.
▪ Sometimes I sit for hours and never get a bite.
▪ The barbecue sauce lacked heat and bite.
▪ The state will be taking a bite out of money earned from local traffic tickets
▪ There's just time for a quick bite to eat before the film begins.
▪ We'll have a bite then go into town.
▪ We woke up to find ourselves covered in mosquito bites.
▪ You can get Lyme disease from a tick bite.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Despite appearances, its bark is definitely worse than its bite.
▪ He now takes bites from his lunch between smokes.
▪ His bee bite, he noticed, was finally gone.
▪ One bite of coffee cake that tasted like a syrupy old sponge and they knew better the next time.
▪ Press harder and it becomes obvious that front-end bite and turn-in are actually very good.
▪ Profits of the Bisto-to-Mr-Kipling-cakes giant have nose-dived from £150m to just over £92m with big bites taken out of both bread and cakes.
▪ Would he care to stay on for a bite to eat?
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Bite

Bite \Bite\, n. [OE. bite, bit, bitt, AS. bite bite, fr. b[=i]tan to bite, akin to Icel. bit, OS. biti, G. biss. See Bite, v., and cf. Bit.]

  1. The act of seizing with the teeth or mouth; the act of wounding or separating with the teeth or mouth; a seizure with the teeth or mouth, as of a bait; as, to give anything a hard bite.

    I have known a very good fisher angle diligently four or six hours for a river carp, and not have a bite.
    --Walton.

  2. The act of puncturing or abrading with an organ for taking food, as is done by some insects.

  3. The wound made by biting; as, the pain of a dog's or snake's bite; the bite of a mosquito.

  4. A morsel; as much as is taken at once by biting.

  5. The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.

  6. A cheat; a trick; a fraud. [Colloq.]

    The baser methods of getting money by fraud and bite, by deceiving and overreaching.
    --Humorist.

  7. A sharper; one who cheats. [Slang]
    --Johnson.

  8. (Print.) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.

Bite

Bite \Bite\ (b[imac]t), v. t. [imp. Bit (b[i^]t); p. p. Bitten (b[i^]t"t'n), Bit; p. pr. & vb. n. Biting.] [OE. biten, AS. b[=i]tan; akin to D. bijten, OS. b[=i]tan, OHG. b[=i]zan, G. beissen, Goth. beitan, Icel. b[=i]ta, Sw. bita, Dan. bide, L. findere to cleave, Skr. bhid to cleave.

  1. To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.

    Such smiling rogues as these, Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain.
    --Shak.

  2. To puncture, abrade, or sting with an organ (of some insects) used in taking food.

  3. To cause sharp pain, or smarting, to; to hurt or injure, in a literal or a figurative sense; as, pepper bites the mouth. ``Frosts do bite the meads.''
    --Shak.

  4. To cheat; to trick; to take in. [Colloq.]
    --Pope.

  5. To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to; as, the anchor bites the ground.

    The last screw of the rack having been turned so often that its purchase crumbled, . . . it turned and turned with nothing to bite.
    --Dickens.

    To bite the dust, To bite the ground, to fall in the agonies of death; as, he made his enemy bite the dust.

    To bite in (Etching), to corrode or eat into metallic plates by means of an acid.

    To bite the thumb at (any one), formerly a mark of contempt, designed to provoke a quarrel; to defy. ``Do you bite your thumb at us?''
    --Shak.

    To bite the tongue, to keep silence.
    --Shak.

Bite

Bite \Bite\, v. i.

  1. To seize something forcibly with the teeth; to wound with the teeth; to have the habit of so doing; as, does the dog bite?

  2. To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent; as, it bites like pepper or mustard.

  3. To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.

    At the last it [wine] biteth like serpent, and stingeth like an adder.
    --Prov. xxiii. 32.

  4. To take a bait into the mouth, as a fish does; hence, to take a tempting offer.

  5. To take or keep a firm hold; as, the anchor bites.

Wiktionary

bite

n. 1 The act of bite#Verb. 2 The wound left behind after having been bitten. 3 The swelling of one's skin caused by an insect's mouthparts or sting. 4 A piece of food of a size that would be produced by bite#Verb; a mouthful. 5 (context slang English) Something unpleasant. 6 (context slang English) An act of plagiarism. 7 A small meal or snack. 8 (context figuratively English) aggression vb. 1 (context transitive English) To cut off a piece by clamping the teeth. 2 (context transitive English) To hold something by clamping one's teeth. 3 (context intransitive English) To attack with the teeth. 4 (context intransitive English) To behave aggressively; to reject advances. 5 (context intransitive English) To take hold; to establish firm contact with. 6 (context intransitive English) To have significant effect, often negative. 7 (context intransitive of a fish English) To bite a baited hook or other lure and thus be caught. 8 (context intransitive metaphor English) To accept something offered, often secretly or deceptively, to cause some action by the acceptor. 9 (context intransitive transitive of an insect English) To sting. 10 (context intransitive English) To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent. 11 (context transitive English) To cause sharp pain, or smarting, to; to hurt or injure, in a literal or a figurative sense. 12 (context intransitive English) To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing. 13 (context intransitive English) To take or keep a firm hold. 14 (context transitive English) To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to. 15 (context intransitive slang English) To lack quality; to be worthy of derision; to suck. 16 (context transitive informal vulgar English) To perform oral sex on. (non-gloss definition: Used in invective). 17 (context intransitive AAVE slang English) To plagiarize, to imitate.

Wikipedia

Bite (disambiguation)

A bite is a wound received from the mouth of an animal or human.

Bite or BITE may also refer to:

Bite (Altered Images album)

Bite is the third and final studio album by the Scottish band Altered Images. It was released in 1983 and was produced by famed producers Mike Chapman and Tony Visconti. It features the UK top ten single "Don't Talk to Me About Love" as well as other singles: "Bring Me Closer", "Love to Stay" and "Change of Heart".

Bite (show)

Bite is a production show which opened at the Stratosphere Las Vegas Hotel & Casino in August 2004. Tim Molyneux is the creator, writer, director and producer of Bite. The choreographers are Mic Thompson, Gary Thomas, Dar Brzezinski and Sarah Fazio.

The show features vampire mythology with classic rock music, human flying, magic, dancing, live signing, martial arts, and contortion. Bite is an 18 years or older show and features topless dancers. Bite is produced by Molyneux Entertainment and plays six nights a week in the Theatre of the Stars at the Stratosphere Las Vegas.

Since 2004, the Bite Las Vegas production has increased its fan base and continues to keep the popularity of vampires growing along with the Twilight book series and blockbuster movie and the HBO original series, True Blood.

Bite (Ned's Atomic Dustbin album)

Bite is a compilation of early singles, along with two previously unreleased tracks ('She's Gone' and 'The Old New 'Un'). Released by the band's former label (Chapter 22), without input or knowledge from the band, while they were putting the final touches on what was to be their debut record God Fodder.

Bite (film)

Bite is a 2015 body-horror film by Canadian writer/director Chad Archibald, produced by Black Fawn Films, and Breakthrough Entertainment about a young woman who is bitten by an waterborne insect while in Costa Rica and suffers horrifying consequences.

WordNet

bite

  1. v. to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws; "Gunny invariably tried to bite her" [syn: seize with teeth]

  2. cause a sharp or stinging pain or discomfort; "The sun burned his face" [syn: sting, burn]

  3. penetrate or cut, as with a knife; "The fork bit into the surface"

  4. deliver a sting to; "A bee stung my arm yesterday" [syn: sting, prick]

  5. [also: bitten, bit]

bite

  1. n. a wound resulting from biting by an animal or a person

  2. a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread" [syn: morsel, bit]

  3. a painful wound caused by the thrust of an insect's stinger into skin [syn: sting, insect bite]

  4. a light informal meal [syn: collation, snack]

  5. (angling) an instance of a fish taking the bait; "after fishing for an hour he still had not had a bite"

  6. wit having a sharp and caustic quality; "he commented with typical pungency"; "the bite of satire" [syn: pungency]

  7. a strong odor or taste property; "the pungency of mustard"; "the sulfurous bite of garlic"; "the sharpness of strange spices" [syn: pungency, sharpness]

  8. the act of gripping or chewing off with the teeth and jaws [syn: chomp]

  9. a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"

  10. [also: bitten, bit]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bite

c.1200, from bite (v).

bite

Old English bitan (class I strong verb; past tense bat, past participle biten), from Proto-Germanic *bitan (cognates: Old Saxon bitan, Old Norse and Old Frisian bita, Middle Dutch biten, Dutch bijten, German beissen, Gothic beitan "to bite"), from PIE root *bheid- "to split, crack" (see fissure).\n

\nTo bite the bullet is said to be 1700s military slang, from old medical custom of having the patient bite a lead bullet during an operation to divert attention from pain and reduce screaming. Figurative use from 1891; the custom itself attested from 1840s. To bite (one's) tongue "refrain from speaking" is 1590s. To bite the dust "die" is 1750 (Latin had the same image; compare Virgil's procubuit moriens et humum semel ore momordit). To bite off more than one can chew (c.1880) is U.S. slang, from plug tobacco.

Usage examples of "bite".

Those who remained, many of them, were bitten by the Nazi aberrations and attempted to apply them to pure science.

A mosquito bite, a cut, or the slightest abrasion, serves for lodgment of the poison with which the air seems to be filled.

Ego camps still absolutize the noosphere, the Eco camps are still absolutizing the biosphere, utterly unaware that this contributes every bit as much as the Ego camps to the destruction of the biosphere itself.

Is there ony bit ye can bide at, not abune twenty miles frae Woodilee?

Already a bit bewildered by their flurry of Classical references and Latin maxims, he was lost when Acer and George exchanged a few lines in French, watching out of the corner of their eyes to see if he had understood.

But all stories about Granny Aching had a bit of fairy tale about them.

The several varieties of Cress are stimulating and anti-scorbutic, whilst each contains a particular essential principle, of acrid flavour, and of sharp biting qualities.

It possesses an acrid, biting taste, somewhat like that of the Peppermint, which resides in the glandular dots sprinkled about its surface, and which is lost in drying.

The former did its own frantic sifting--something CIA automatically does, looking for that actionable bit of gold.

I dare say if those letters had ever reached their addressees, some of them would have been every bit as astonished as Lubov was and just about as likely to welcome their assignments.

Seemed like our little bit of land had been uprooted and had gone adrift, far out to sea.

Right now, my twin lies to the Council, saying that you threw me into the ocean and that I am adrift at sea, clinging to a bit of wood.

Change until adulthood, usually between the ages of eighteen and twenty-one, a human bitten by a werewolf was a werewolf immediately, regardless of his age.

All at once the group opened up a bit and they saw a silvery, glittering aeroplane, agleam with new aluminum paint, throbbing and vibrating, as if anxious to be off.

Bit Yakin, had come from afar with his servants, and entered the valley of Alkmeenon.