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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bide

verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
time
▪ Voice over Britain may have to bide it's time for it's next tennis hero ... It could be Tim Henman.
▪ Meanwhile, Mission Bay bided its time.
▪ Where does it bide its time?
▪ Keenan certainly bided his time before coming forward to lodge his complaints.
▪ He knows he would probably lose now and can afford to bide his time.
▪ He has bided his time, and now he feels he has arrived.
▪ It was as if he was just biding his time.
▪ It was possible, of course, that Stillman was merely biding his time, lulling the world into lethargy before striking.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
Bide your time, Lissa, she told herself, bide your time.
▪ Be patient, tolerant and bide your time.
▪ But he was biding his time.
▪ He has bided his time, and now he feels he has arrived.
▪ He knows he would probably lose now and can afford to bide his time.
▪ It was as if he was just biding his time.
▪ Meanwhile, Mission Bay bided its time.
▪ The nurse was biding her time till another idea came to her that would put her on top again.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Bide

Bide \Bide\, v. t.

  1. To encounter; to remain firm under (a hardship); to endure; to suffer; to undergo.

    Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm.
    --Shak.

  2. To wait for; as, I bide my time. See Abide.

Bide

Bide \Bide\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Bided; p. pr. & vb. n. Biding.] [OE. biden, AS. b[=i]dan; akin to OHG. b[=i]tan, Goth. beidan, Icel. b[=i]??; perh. orig., to wait with trust, and akin to bid. See Bid, v. t., and cf. Abide.]

  1. To dwell; to inhabit; to abide; to stay.

    All knees to thee shall bow of them that bide In heaven or earth, or under earth, in hell.
    --Milton.

  2. To remain; to continue or be permanent in a place or state; to continue to be.
    --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bide

Old English bidan "to stay, continue, live, remain," also "to trust, rely," from Proto-Germanic *bidan "to await" (cognates: Old Norse biða, Old Saxon bidan, Old Frisian bidia, Middle Dutch biden, Old High German bitan, Gothic beidan "to wait"), which is of uncertain origin. Possibly from PIE *bheidh- "to trust" (via notion of "to await trustingly"). Preserved in Scotland and northern England, replaced elsewhere by abide in all senses except to bide one's time. Related: Bided; biding.

Wiktionary

bide

vb. 1 (context transitive chiefly dialectal English) To bear; to endure; to tolerate. 2 (context intransitive archaic or dialectal English) To dwell or reside in a location; to abide. 3 (context intransitive archaic or dialectal English) To wait; to be in expectation; to stay; to remain. 4 (context transitive archaic English) To wait for; to await.

Wikipedia

Bide

Bide may refer to:

  • Bïde, an indigenous people of Brazil
  • BIDE model, a model used in population ecology
  • Austin Bide (1915–2008), British chemist and industrialist
WordNet

bide

v. dwell; "You can stay with me while you are in town"; "stay a bit longer--the day is still young" [syn: abide, stay]

Usage examples of "bide".

Is there ony bit ye can bide at, not abune twenty miles frae Woodilee?

Nay, thou shalt bide here in safety whilst I go forward--to visit Atene as I promised.

That he was now the President of the College of Tribunes of the Plebs did not bode well for tribunician antics of demagogue kind.

The porno theaters and by-the-hour motels yield to botdnicas and bode gas outlets for Discos Latinos, an infinite array of food stands--taco joints, Peruvian seafood parlors, fast-food franchises-and first-rate Latino restaurants, beauty shops with windows guarded by Styrofoam skulls wearing blond Dynel wigs, Cuban bakeries, storefront medical and legal clinics, bars and social clubs.

City in these deceptively peaceful times did not bode well for the continued safety of Rhomatum streets or its treaty with Mauritum.

Sir Huhmfree Gawlin, bide the night in the citadel and ride with his reply on the morrow.

Lairds should bide in their ain houses if the land is to have any gude of them.

He was using spinning gear, working a variety of plugs and spoons and jigs and plastic worms in all of the spots where a lunker largemouth was likely to be biding his time.

Yet Philip was biding his time in prison, having the life siphoned out of him.

Ambiorix and the Eburones were there beyond the sleety rain, biding their time with the complacence of men who knew the terrain a great deal better than the Romans did.

But Ambiorix and the Eburones were there beyond the sleety rain, biding their time with the complacence of men who knew the terrain a great deal better than the Romans did.

As tha nears a breeter land: Tho thi rooad is hard to climb, Be content, an bide thi time.

God that works in thae hills and the Devil--ay, the manifold devils--that He suffers to bide here?

There we shall bide, and it is like enough that for a month or more you may find us there, ere we are ready for our viage back to France.

I dochtna bide To hear yer bonnie name, Whaur muckle mous war opened wide Wi' lawless mirth and shame.