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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Batta

Batta \Bat"ta\ (b[a^]t"t[.a]), n. [Prob. through Pg. for Canarese bhatta rice in the husk.] Extra pay; esp. an extra allowance to an English officer serving in Indi


  1. --Whitworth. [1913 Webster] ||

Batta

Batta \Bat"ta\ (b[a^]t"t[.a]), n. [Hind. ba[.t][.t]a.] Rate of exchange; also, the discount on uncurrent coins.

Wiktionary
batta

n. 1 (context India dated English) An exchange rate. 2 (context India dated English) The discount on uncurrent coins. 3 (context India dated English) Extra pay; especially an extra allowance to an English officer serving in India.

Wikipedia
Batta

During the British Raj, Batta or Bhatta was a military term, meaning a special allowance made to officers, soldiers, or other public servants in the field. The term is probably derived from the Kanaresebhatta (rice in the husk).

In Hindi, the term bhatta (भत्ता) is now used to refer to allowance made to military personnel or other public servants.

Usage examples of "batta".

I shall loose an insect in my tightly screened dining-room when Batta, my house-boy, brings in breakfast--keeping well on guard myself.

I shall let Batta go on, however, for I want a rough idea of how long it takes to finish a case.

Three months and eight days finished Batta and here Moore is alive over a year after his biting.

In a cold perspiration I remembered the actions of the fly that had bitten Batta when Batta died.

In the early part of the year there were signs of disaffection throughout the north-west districts, and the native garrison of Delhi manifested some insubordination on account of batta which they demanded if ordered beyond the Sutlej, and which the government had determined to refuse.

An order was issued to this effect, and the troops in Bengal were put upon the same footing as the troops on the Coromandel Coast, by whom no batta was drawn, except when actually marching or serving on the field of battle.

Out of the money paid by Tippoo the commander-in-chief made a spontaneous gift to his troops, equal to six months batta, in order to soothe them for the disappointment of their expectations of booty in the storming of Seringapatam, and for their good conduct during the war.