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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

ban

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a driving ban (=a legal order that forbids you to drive)
▪ After the accident he faced a three-year driving ban.
an export ban (also a ban on exports)
▪ During the crisis, France imposed an export ban on British beef.
▪ The ban on exports was lifted in June.
an illegal/banned/prohibited substance (=used mainly to refer to illegal drugs)
▪ Any player found guilty of using banned substances faces the prospect of a lengthy suspension.
an import ban
▪ The US imposed an import ban on several types of fish.
ban exports (=stop them completely)
▪ In retaliation, Britain banned exports of cloth to France.
ban imports (=make them illegal)
▪ The organization wants the government to ban imports of exotic birds.
Ban Ki-moon
be banned/disqualified from driving (=be forbidden to drive by law)
▪ Murray was banned from driving for six months after admitting to speeding.
call for a ban
▪ French farmers have called for a ban on imports.
doping scandal/ban/test etc
▪ doping offences
enforce a ban
▪ The ban on commercial whaling can only be enforced with the international cooperation.
test ban
▪ the test ban treaty
total ban
▪ a total ban on cigarette advertising
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
complete
▪ The deal has angered environmentalists, who want a complete ban on peat extraction.
▪ However, the point is that if there were a complete test ban, there would be no nuclear tests allowed.
▪ They've criticised the headmaster, and say he should impose a complete ban on cigarettes.Mike Rowbottom reports.
▪ Only one in seven has a complete ban, Mr Stubbs said.
▪ It is thought that a complete overtime ban will go ahead.
▪ If the state bar decides against a complete ban, Miss Roybal-Allard may introduce a new bill requiring it to have one.
▪ This impaired breeding activity and led to a complete ban on artificial feeding.
▪ Ash, he said, did not advocate complete bans on smoking.
comprehensive
▪ Or that a comprehensive test ban might not be possible - even desirable - at some point in the future.
▪ I am increasingly convinced that a comprehensive test ban would be a big step to take in curbing proliferation.
▪ But it has refused to sign up to the comprehensive test ban treaty.
▪ We must also pursue a comprehensive test ban treaty.
constitutional
▪ As President, Özal refused to consider an immediate suspension of the constitutional ban on political parties.
▪ Pete Wilson, has vowed to remove language in the party platform that calls for a constitutional ban on abortions.
▪ A less controversial proposal was a constitutional ban on the extradition of drug traffickers to stand trial in the United States.
▪ The convention could include a battle over whether to retain the platform plank calling for a constitutional ban on abortion.
▪ Anti-abortionists have launched a vigorous campaign to reinforce the constitutional ban on abortion.
▪ They must somehow persuade Republicans to de-emphasize a constitutional ban in order to win allies outside of the antiabortion camp.
▪ Robert Dornan and Patrick Buchanan -- to pledge to continue to include in the Republican platform a constitutional ban on abortions.
driving
▪ Besides the jail sentence Mr Hayton now faces and eight year driving ban increased from four years.
▪ He has been sentenced to two years in prison and given a five-year driving ban.
▪ He was given a three-year driving ban.
▪ Original sentence: Two years' probation and three-year driving ban.
▪ His driving ban will soon pass - her parents' grief never will.
▪ Original sentence: Three-year driving ban and a fine.
▪ Because of the driving ban, Roberts would lose his job.
federal
▪ A recently proposed federal ban on feeding animal protein to animals is encouraging, writes Rhodes, but has too many loopholes.
global
▪ We will in addition work for a global ban on chemical and biological weapons and stronger controls to prevent proliferation of ballistic missiles.
immediate
▪ Along with the points from the latter, that would mean an immediate ban.
▪ Norman Schwarzkopf, advocate an immediate international ban.
▪ Although an immediate ban on all anti-personnel mines was endorsed by 15 retired generals, including Gen.
international
▪ In the case of the News International ban it offered clear guidance on how the professional should react.
▪ Norman Schwarzkopf, advocate an immediate international ban.
▪ The News International ban was just the type of dispute that must have been envisaged when the Code was drawn up.
▪ President Clinton is on the verge of deciding how best to pursue an international ban on land mines.
▪ The Centre supports the continuation of limited ivory trading, in defiance of an international ban.
nuclear
▪ Would not an extension and strengthening of the nuclear test ban treaty be a means of helping the Soviet people?
▪ The choice will soon be between a total nuclear weapons ban, and a wildfire spread of nuclear technology.
outright
▪ Ministers insist that voluntary agreements with the tobacco industry are more effective than outright bans.
▪ The San Francisco-based trade organization reports that 21 states have an outright ban on out-of-state shipments of alcoholic beverages.
▪ A number argued that an outright ban should be introduced on the holding of client money by sole practitioners.
▪ The proposal came amid fears that the Ministry of Agriculture might introduce tougher restrictions or even an outright ban.
▪ Eminent scientists are clamouring for an outright ban on all chlorine substances.
total
▪ They then barred him from watching Prisoner Cell Block H, before extending it to a total television ban.
▪ But Congress overrode those draft guidelines before they were finalized and imposed a total ban two years ago.
▪ These will include maintaining the status quo, retaining hunting with new restrictions, a partial ban, and a total ban.
▪ Maybe at a later date a total ban will be introduced.
▪ There have been total bans in many other countries dating from more than five years ago.
▪ The Reading attitude survey found 15 percent of smokers - and 67 percent of non-smokers - favoured a total ban.
▪ A total ban might also be opposed as an unconstitutional invasion of privacy.
▪ A total ban on all advertising and promotion.
■ NOUN
advertising
▪ An advertising ban will save many children from being misled into thinking smoking is a smart, sophisticated practice.
▪ For what other reason does he oppose a blanket advertising ban on tobacco?
▪ Nevertheless, it has to be recognised that several interests may feel threatened by an advertising ban.
blanket
▪ The idea behind this imposition of blanket bans was to prevent the temptation to discriminate against particular marches.
▪ They already had been instructed to avoid Simpson coverage, but Fujisaki expanded his order to a blanket ban on all news.
▪ The ban is a blanket ban covering all marches or all marches of a particular class such as political marches.
▪ His support for a 15-month blanket ban on strikes suggests that he is still not wholly aware of this fact.
▪ One of the most urgent measures is a blanket ban on all animal and bone meal in animal feed.
▪ The existing blacklist of substances not to be dumped at sea would be superseded by the blanket ban.
▪ Cine Blitz International publisher Rajesh Mehra attacked the blanket ban.
export
▪ From now on, these items will be included in the existing export ban of leg irons, shackles and gang chains.
▪ On the other hand, only works of art made more than one hundred years ago will carry an export ban.
▪ He warned that material shortages resulting from such export bans were bringing many enterprises to a standstill.
▪ Buyers used to come from all over the world until the export ban.
import
▪ The number of individual countries with hazardous waste import bans is now over one hundred.
lifetime
▪ Read in studio Weightlifter Andrew Saxton is tonight hopeful that he won't now face a lifetime ban from his sport.
▪ He said the arguments for Proposition 140 do not say that a lifetime ban is not imposed.
▪ If you refuse, you will be treated as though you had failed the test, and you will face a lifetime ban.
▪ A federal court has upheld legislative term limits in Maine that do not have a lifetime ban.
▪ This can reduce weight but it also constitutes drug-taking, for which you may face a lifetime ban.
▪ The ruling yesterday is expected to have an impact on six other states that have legislative term limits with lifetime bans.
▪ Whether Proposition 140 imposes a lifetime ban was a major issue discussed by the state Supreme Court in 1991.
▪ Some backers of the initiative feared that a lifetime ban would make the measure easier to overturn later.
test
▪ The campaign's agenda of Trident, conversion, test bans and warhead convoys is plenty wide enough.
▪ A test ban that could not inspire confidence would undermine stability and might even provoke a new arms race.
▪ Or that a comprehensive test ban might not be possible - even desirable - at some point in the future.
▪ A test ban is the least of the proliferators' worries.
▪ However, the point is that if there were a complete test ban, there would be no nuclear tests allowed.
▪ Nuclear disarmers are right in saying that a test ban would stop weapons builders trying out new and fancier designs.
▪ I am increasingly convinced that a comprehensive test ban would be a big step to take in curbing proliferation.
▪ But it has refused to sign up to the comprehensive test ban treaty.
treaty
▪ But it has refused to sign up to the comprehensive test ban treaty.
▪ Would not an extension and strengthening of the nuclear test ban treaty be a means of helping the Soviet people?
▪ We must also pursue a comprehensive test ban treaty.
■ VERB
call
▪ Residents first called for a ban four years ago, claiming that heavy vehicles were ruining their quality of life.
▪ Pete Wilson, has vowed to remove language in the party platform that calls for a constitutional ban on abortions.
▪ The convention could include a battle over whether to retain the platform plank calling for a constitutional ban on abortion.
▪ Now, only the House bill calls for the ban, authored by Rep.
defy
▪ He thought she was probably here without his permission, perhaps defying a specific ban.
end
▪ There were frequent clashes over the reporting of Northern Ireland, ending with a ban on interviews with members of SinnFein.
▪ And last March, the Ministry of Trade ended a yearlong ban on importing used vehicles.
enforce
▪ The militants enforced the ban on cheating in school exams, and even that old tradition disappeared.
▪ Wednesday afternoon, riot police were out on the streets of Belgrade to enforce a ban on marches by anti-Milosevic demonstrators.
▪ And there's some doubt as to whether the council can make its tenant farmers enforce the ban.
extend
▪ This coincided with a change that extended the ban on share buy-ins to companies domiciled elsewhere.
▪ But councillors stopped short of extending the ban to land which is leased by tenant farmers.
▪ If Hateley is found guilty of violent conduct, the disciplinary committee are empowered to extend the player's ban.
face
▪ They will face longer bans, higher fines and the possibility of their vehicles being confiscated.
▪ Next month's prestigious Cheltenham Festival is among meetings facing a possible ban.
▪ Azharuddin and four other players who were suspended now face possible life bans.
▪ Middlesbrough skipper Alan Kernaghan, who faces a two-match ban, received another booking when he fouled Halsall.
▪ Read in studio Weightlifter Andrew Saxton is tonight hopeful that he won't now face a lifetime ban from his sport.
▪ Cross Keys face a two-week playing ban after having their fifth player sent off this season.
▪ He faces a four-year ban after failing a drugs test at the Barcelona Olympics.
▪ If you refuse, you will be treated as though you had failed the test, and you will face a lifetime ban.
impose
▪ They've criticised the headmaster, and say he should impose a complete ban on cigarettes.Mike Rowbottom reports.
▪ But Congress overrode those draft guidelines before they were finalized and imposed a total ban two years ago.
▪ The governor of Leyte island blamed the government for failing to impose a total logging ban.
▪ Whether Proposition 140 imposes a lifetime ban was a major issue discussed by the state Supreme Court in 1991.
▪ Lawyers for Attorney General Dan Lungren argued that the initiative did not impose a lifetime ban.
▪ Environmental groups deplored the failure of the convention to impose an absolute ban on the dumping of radioactive waste.
▪ In his decision, Reinhardt said voters had not been properly informed that the law imposed a lifetime ban on candidates.
include
▪ An attempt to include such a ban sank the last effort at constitutional reform, made by Congress in 1989.
▪ The new bill includes a second ban on the trading of sea turtles and rare coral.
introduce
▪ The only clear case where this strategy succeeded was when Thatcher introduced the SinnFéin broadcasting ban.
▪ We will encourage local authorities to introduce peak-hour bans on cars, traffic calming measures, car-sharing schemes and further pedestrianisation.
▪ Oil slick prompts no-fishing zone Fishermen have introduced a voluntary ban on fishing in the area surrounding the Shetland oil slick.
▪ Another county council could introduce a similar ban before the hunting season begins.
lift
▪ The bill would lift a ban on U.S. pharmacists re-importing drugs.
▪ The new laws also lift a ban on multiple trade unions operating in a single workplace, something workers have sought.
▪ At a stroke he was lifting the ban on radios and newspapers.
▪ After becoming president, Clinton was praised for pledging to enact a measure to lift the ban on homosexuals in the military.
▪ Other parties King Birendra lifted the ban on political parties in April 1990.
▪ But lifting the ban could take weeks.
▪ Agricultural emergency committee still haven't lifted the ban.
oppose
▪ For what other reason does he oppose a blanket advertising ban on tobacco?
▪ Whitman enraged conservatives by opposing a ban on late-term abortions sent to her by the state legislature.
▪ On Jan. 5 eight journalists were suspended, apparently for opposing the ban.
▪ Traditionally, Democrats opposed any limits or bans on PACs and Republicans opposed any limit on overall spending.
overturn
▪ It has also launched a bid to overturn a ban on the use of vast factory whaling ships.
▪ President Clinton has said he will veto any attempt to overturn the ban.
▪ He is likely to overturn the Bush ban on abortion counselling and the military's outlawing of gays.
▪ Mr Justice Gage overturned a previous ban on any picture or artist's impression being published of George.
▪ The Fayre, at Hillersland near Coleford, took place after a last minute legal battle to overturn a music licence ban.
propose
▪ It proposes a two-year ban on exports of toxic waste while the new technologies are being tested.
▪ A recently proposed federal ban on feeding animal protein to animals is encouraging, writes Rhodes, but has too many loopholes.
▪ In proposing a ban on strikes, the Soviet leadership therefore wished to nip the incipient labour movement in the bud.
▪ A proposed statewide ban on the guns was vetoed by Gov.
▪ The council took no action on the proposed ban.
repeal
▪ A resolution to repeal the ban, sponsored by Rep.
▪ I will veto any attempt to repeal the assault weapons ban or the Brady bill.
▪ He still stands for repealing the assault weapons ban.
seek
▪ He was sufficiently influenced by the Lewisham events to seek a ban on similar marches in the months that followed.
support
▪ On a somewhat more controversial issue, Mr Milburn and Mr Bergg said they would support a ban on fox hunting.
▪ Polls show a distinct majority of New Yorkers share Pataki's view and support the ban on hand-held phones.
▪ He supports a ban on gay marriages.
▪ The large crowd at the meeting was nearly evenly divided between those supporting the ban and those against.
▪ Another 27 percent said they support a ban with a mention of tolerance.
▪ An Examiner poll showed that California voters, by a nearly 2-1 ratio, support the ban.
vote
▪ It is expected they will vote for a ban.
▪ One who voted against the ban, Rep.
▪ Gloucestershire joins neighbouring Hereford and Worcester, and Wiltshire councils which have also voted in similar bans.
▪ However, the override is given little chance of passing the Senate where 54 senators voted for the ban last year.
▪ Gloucestershire County Council will vote on the ban tomorrow - the anti-hunt groups say they're confident of victory.
▪ How many Labour supporters would vote for a ban on fishing?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
blanket statement/rule/ban etc
▪ Cine Blitz International publisher Rajesh Mehra attacked the blanket ban.
▪ His support for a 15-month blanket ban on strikes suggests that he is still not wholly aware of this fact.
▪ One of the most urgent measures is a blanket ban on all animal and bone meal in animal feed.
▪ The ban is a blanket ban covering all marches or all marches of a particular class such as political marches.
▪ The existing blacklist of substances not to be dumped at sea would be superseded by the blanket ban.
▪ The idea behind this imposition of blanket bans was to prevent the temptation to discriminate against particular marches.
▪ The state bar would prefer to set a blanket rule governing all types of lawyers.
▪ They already had been instructed to avoid Simpson coverage, but Fujisaki expanded his order to a blanket ban on all news.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A ban has been imposed on the hunting and killing of whales.
▪ The city has imposed a ban on smoking in all restaurants.
▪ The government is considering a total ban on the sale of handguns.
▪ The new prime minister agreed to lift the ban on opposition newspapers.
▪ There has been worldwide protest against the ban on girls' education.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Eminent scientists are clamouring for an outright ban on all chlorine substances.
▪ He has championed the popular ban on assault-style weapons, defending it with gusto as Republicans try to repeal it.
▪ I will veto any attempt to repeal the assault weapons ban or the Brady bill.
▪ It also believes strongly that there should be a ban on the import of hazardous waste into the United Kingdom.
▪ Last year he was convicted of breaking that ban ... and was given a jail sentence.
▪ Moscow is considering a ban on alcohol and tobacco advertising in most public places and on transport.
▪ The ban went into effect at midnight, Aug. 25, 1988, Higgins said.
▪ The ban will take effect in November.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
abortion
▪ He supports parental notification and opposes government funding, but does not advocate a constitutional amendment banning abortion.
▪ The Senate gave President Clinton a victory Thursday when lawmakers sustained his veto of a bill banning certain late-term abortions.
▪ The bill would have banned an abortion procedure known to health professionals as intact dilation and extraction.
▪ Last month the senator complicated their task by reiterating his support for some exceptions to a constitutional amendment banning abortion.
▪ Clinton on April 10 vetoed a bill that would have banned so-called partial birth abortions.
▪ Clinton would support language banning the abortion technique as an elective procedure, another White House aide said.
action
▪ The bill would also ban political action committee contributions to federal candidates.
activity
▪ Law Local laws may ban particular activities.
▪ However, Gordon had in the meantime banned all patient activities with outsiders.
▪ In 1979 he was expelled from the National Assembly and was subsequently banned from political activity.
▪ In September the government introduced legislation in parliament banning all such activity.
▪ Palau's constitution bans nuclear activity unless agreed by at least 75 percent of voters.
advertising
▪ Britain bans cigarette advertising on television, but, with tough restrictions, allows other tobacco advertising.
▪ New Zealand banned all advertising of tobacco in 1990.
▪ The debate is not about banning the advertising of tobacco.
▪ Okay, so we don't ban beer advertising, just lager advertising.
▪ The organisers should accept their responsibility and ban tobacco advertising.
bill
▪ The same Bill will ban the remaining forms of secondary action, and outlaw closed shop agreements altogether.
▪ Mike Leavitt has signed into law a bill banning public schools from granting recognition or access to gay or lesbian student groups.
▪ The Senate gave President Clinton a victory Thursday when lawmakers sustained his veto of a bill banning certain late-term abortions.
▪ Y., has introduced a bill to ban federal funds from being spent on programs that teach ebonics as a language.
▪ The bill would have banned an abortion procedure known to health professionals as intact dilation and extraction.
▪ The bill would also ban political action committee contributions to federal candidates.
▪ But with his veto this week of a bill that would have banned lobbyist gifts, the perplexed-bear analogy no longer works.
▪ This year, the state Legislature spent months debating a bill that would have banned the teaching of evolution as fact.
book
▪ Just in the past year, the party has banned dozens of books and closed numerous publishing houses.
▪ And thousands of his disciples, the seminarians who read his banned books, do so clandestinely.
▪ The publicity generated by the government's efforts to ban the book ensured that it became an instant bestseller.
▪ Consequently, he ruled, the Education Ministry had been perfectly within its rights to ban the book.
country
▪ Cronenberg maintains that a literal visualisation would have cost US$400 million and been banned in every country in the world.
▪ Its use has been banned in six countries and restricted in 19.
▪ The book is banned in several countries and has not been publicised.
court
▪ In court he was banned from keeping animals for 2 years.
▪ But his bid backfired when Anne got a court order banning Bill, 70, from living within 20 miles of her.
▪ The company has already obtained an interim interdict at the Court of Session banning the inciting or organising of mass picketing.
▪ But a court order bans him from any contact with the baby.
driving
▪ Judge Angus Stroyan sentenced him to 12 months in jail and banned him from driving for two years.
▪ He was banned from driving for 6 months and ordered to do 200 hours of community service.
▪ He was banned from driving for a year.
▪ Both were also banned from driving for a year and ordered to pay £25 costs.
▪ His father, Earl Bathurst, was banned from driving after a drink-drive conviction 4 years ago.
drug
▪ This drug is banned under the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act.
▪ The drug was banned more than 20 years later when the adults who were exposed in utero developed vaginal and testicular cancers.
▪ Although the pure drug was banned it was not certain whether a naturally-occurring substance containing the drug was illegal.
▪ Texas banned the sale of ephedrine to minors after ten teenagers were taken to emergency rooms after overdosing on the drug.
▪ The drug has been banned in Great Britain since 1992.
export
▪ More than 90 countries drafted a treaty in September that would ban export and use of anti-personnel mines.
government
▪ Could the government ban union membership amongst civil servants working at its intelligence headquarters without consulting union leaders?
▪ On Nov. 18 in a crackdown on corruption the government banned the heads of state structures from commercial activities.
▪ In a separate directive, the government banned the broadcasting of rebel propaganda, comments, and interviews.
▪ Should governments be free to ban imports of things they fear will become extinct?
▪ After those killings, the federal government banned the import of semi-automatic weapons.
import
▪ Should governments be free to ban imports of things they fear will become extinct?
▪ About 20 of the weapons, banned for private import by federal law in 1989, were resold for substantial profit.
▪ After those killings, the federal government banned the import of semi-automatic weapons.
law
▪ Sean Pierce of Fort Smith, Arkansas, was charged with violating a law banning the public display of obscene material.
▪ By contrast, it said, the Florida law simply banned all cross-burning.
▪ Certain religions may prohibit particular types of food, alcoholic drink or restrict dress. Law Local laws may ban particular activities.
▪ We are now circulating petitions calling for a federal law to ban handguns.
▪ In 2000 they are breaking a law that bans proselytising by foreigners.
▪ Background: A New Jersey law banned the importation of waste materials from outside the state.
▪ More and more states were adopting laws which banned the sale of alcohol.
legislation
▪ The same applied to traditional football except that in this case legislation merely banned the game from the public highway.
▪ Federal legislation banning narcotics had already been enacted three years earlier and the prohibition of alcohol was only two years away.
▪ The legislation also bans the practice of paying incentives to doctors to prescribe expensive brand name medicines.
▪ They said Congress' recent legislation banning federal funds for doctor-assisted suicide will make passage of any new state law more difficult.
▪ The President signed legislation banning discrimination against the disabled on June 26.
▪ Congress is considering legislation that would ban such donations.
▪ In September the government introduced legislation in parliament banning all such activity.
▪ The government finally agreed to fresh negotiations and promised not to proceed with legislation on banning strikes for two years.
order
▪ The government, nervous about the nobility's reaction to the agreement, issued an order banning tournaments.
▪ The bill would abolish the distinction between domestic and international banning orders.
▪ But his bid backfired when Anne got a court order banning Bill, 70, from living within 20 miles of her.
▪ At the start of the trial Fujisaki issued an order banning anyone from contacting jurors.
▪ Currency crisis A government order banning the sale of luxury items was extended on Nov. 18.
▪ But a court order bans him from any contact with the baby.
▪ Marchers gathered in defiance of a government order that banned May Day celebrations and protests.
party
▪ It stipulated that neutrality should be guaranteed by banning them from accepting party political positions or speaking publicly on behalf of political parties.
▪ Many observers argue that banning political parties is counter-productive because it forces moderates into more extreme positions.
▪ But they are banned from party membership and can not vote for the party at election time.
▪ Husayn suspended the constitution, declared martial law, banned all political parties and arrested hundreds of politicians.
▪ Separate legislation passed on the same day banned political party cells in state and government bodies.
practice
▪ The legislation also bans the practice of paying incentives to doctors to prescribe expensive brand name medicines.
▪ It also banned the practice of transporting pepper-sprayed suspects in a prone position, saying the practice could contribute to suffocation.
procedure
▪ Forbes said he disapproves of abortion, but he has refused to endorsed a constitutional amendment banning the procedure.
▪ The bill would have banned an abortion procedure known to health professionals as intact dilation and extraction.
product
▪ But Mars say it's unfair that Walls have banned other products from their freezers.
▪ Thirty-four California cities have banned its product.
▪ It even banned products with parts and components made by boycotted firms.
▪ Background: Hammer v. Dagenhart concerned an act of Congress that banned the products of child labor from interstate commerce.
proposal
▪ There is no proposal to ban cigarettes - only their advertising and promotion.
sale
▪ Traders must display a notice banning sales to under 16 year olds.
▪ Can schools ban the sale of underground publications on campus?
▪ However, it's already outlawed using the plates on public roads and now it's to ban their sale.
▪ Texas banned the sale of ephedrine to minors after ten teenagers were taken to emergency rooms after overdosing on the drug.
▪ Where a device or software has lawful uses, it would obviously be unsatisfactory to ban its sale.
▪ In addition: Vermont banned the sale of new cars that use ozone-depleting chemicals in their air-conditioning units.
▪ But it recently forced the government to promise new laws banning sales of alcohol.
▪ More and more states were adopting laws which banned the sale of alcohol.
state
▪ The state banned all fishing in a 105-square-mile area in the Block Island Sound on Sunday.
trade
▪ Appendix 1 species are banned from all international trade, except where special licensing arrangements apply.
▪ The agreements expired in 1992 and were not renewed, because they afforded the kind of protection banned under international trade agreements.
▪ The Reptile Protection Trust wants to ban the trade in pet turtles.
▪ Parliament in its wisdom or folly has banned all such trade, true enough.
treaty
▪ Next week he will appeal to the Senate to ratify a global treaty to ban chemical weapons.
use
▪ We have banned the use of veal crates, and taken action to ensure humane slaughter.
▪ More than 90 countries drafted a treaty in September that would ban export and use of anti-personnel mines.
▪ It introduced a code of conduct for political parties, banning the use of language likely to incite violence or hatred.
▪ International action is now needed to ban the use of gill-nets by amateur fishermen.
▪ The latest outcome is there is move to ban the use of electronics on the lake.
▪ It said it would also seek to ban the fungicides' use on tomatoes, potatoes and bananas.
▪ But the industry is rejecting growing calls for legislation to ban the use of gene test results in assessing cover.
▪ And it was only last November that the government banned its use for all farm animals.
weapon
▪ Dole said the assault weapons ban did not work, because many of the weapons were altered to make them legal.
▪ About 20 of the weapons, banned for private import by federal law in 1989, were resold for substantial profit.
■ VERB
decide
▪ But most insurance companies have decided not to cover banned breeds.
try
▪ Those Communist regimes which tried to ban religion were known for their cruelty.
▪ California tried to ban the broadcast but failed.
▪ These days it's Left-wing councillors and trendy heads who try to ban Xmas.
▪ In effect they tried to ban laughter.
vote
▪ Time allowed 00:19 Read in studio Another county council has voted to ban fox hunting on publicly-owned land.
▪ Time allowed 06:31 Read in studio A council has voted to ban foxhunting on all its parks and open spaces.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Lady Chatterley's Lover" was banned when it was first published.
▪ a new international treaty banning all nuclear tests
▪ Comics were banned in my house because my parents thought they weren't a good influence.
▪ Elephant ivory is banned in the U.S.
▪ Films like that should be banned!
▪ Many doctors now say that boxing should be banned.
▪ Relatives of the prisoners were banned from visiting them.
▪ She was banned from driving for 6 months.
▪ The government has banned public officials from accepting gifts from foreigners.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And with one of the country's top competition climbers banned by his own governing body, the situation could deteriorate.
▪ Congress's effort to ban indecent materials on the Internet comes to the court March 19.
▪ Many of the buildings in the old town were six storeys high and the lanes so narrow that all but pedestrians were banned.
▪ The Senate gave President Clinton a victory Thursday when lawmakers sustained his veto of a bill banning certain late-term abortions.
▪ They had banned all transit flights across the port.
▪ Well, I would ban them too if I had my way.
Wikipedia

BAN

BAN may refer to:

  • Balinese language, ISO 639 alpha-3, "ban"
  • Bangladesh at the Olympics, IOC country code
  • Basel Action Network
  • Basongo Airport, IATA airport code, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Body Area Network
  • British Approved Name, for a pharmaceutical substance
  • Burrows–Abadi–Needham logic, BAN logic, used to analyse authentication protocols

Ban (title)

Ban was a noble title used in several states in Central and Southeastern Europe between the 7th century and the 20th century. In English, common term for the province governed by ban is banate and term for the office of ban is banship.

Ban (law)

A ban is a formal or informal prohibition of something. Bans are formed for the prohibition of activities within a certain political territory. Some see this as a negative act (equating it to a form of censorship or discrimination) and others see it as maintaining the " status quo". Some bans in commerce are referred to as embargoes. Ban is also used as a verb similar in meaning to "to prohibit".

Ban (river)

The Ban is a left tributary of the river Crasna in Romania. It discharges into the Crasna in the town Crasna.

Ban (medieval)

The ban was a political and territorial institution in the Frankish kingdoms, meaning a grant of power to command men. Following its civil, military or religious meanings, it ended up as a metonym for territory where such a grant applied. When the public rights of assembly members came to be held by a family line, the ban was confused more or less (sometimes totally) with seigneurial power in the Middle Ages.

It related to the recognition of the rights of Christian communities organised by a specific political assembly, representative of free men adhering to this group. The king, anxious for the good evangelisation that the bishop and troops of monks guaranteed to him, participated in its foundation and granted it a generous financial and territorial basis from the fisc (i.e. from the vast royal lands). The territorial granted to the grand ban appeared in the 7th century at the borders of Austrasia and rapidly developed at the end of the Merovingian era.

Major aristocrats, whether in their duties as counts or dukes, or at the bans' initiative via their clientele networks, supervised or oversaw these semi-autonomous entities, highly reinforcing their spiritual and temporal power. A secular economic life developed around the monasteries, and their founders' families were also buried there, with both developments turning them into sacred sites, perpetuating the hierarchy of the episcopal city and the harmony of the dioceses from the Late Roman Empire. Troubles and rivalries between these new semi-autonomous princes and their bands of troops, along with the development of fiefdoms brought about a collapse of the Late Roman structures and of those of the first kingdom of the Franks.

Ban (surname)

Ban is the Mandarin pinyin romanization of the Chinese surname written in Chinese character. It is romanized Pan in Wade–Giles. Ban is listed 235th in the Song dynasty classic text Hundred Family Surnames. It is not among the 300 most common surnames in China.

Ban (Korean name)

Ban, also spelled Bahn or Pan, is a Korean family name and an element in Korean given names. Its meaning depends on the hanja used to write it.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Ban

Ban \Ban\, n. [Serv. ban; cf. Russ. & Pol. pan a master, lord, Per. ban.] An ancient title of the warden of the eastern marches of Hungary; now, a title of the viceroy of Croatia and Slavonia.

Ban

Ban \Ban\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Banned (b[a^]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Banning.] [OE. bannen, bannien, to summon, curse, AS. bannan to summon; akin to Dan. bande, forbande, to curse, Sw. banna to revile, bannas to curse. See Ban an edict, and cf. Banish.]

  1. To curse; to invoke evil upon.
    --Sir W. Scott.

  2. To forbid; to interdict.
    --Byron.

Ban

Ban \Ban\, v. i. To curse; to swear. [Obs.]
--Spenser.

Ban

Ban \Ban\ (b[a^]n), n. A kind of fine muslin, made in the East Indies from the fiber of the banana leaf stalks.

Ban

Ban \Ban\ (b[a^]n), n. [AS. bann command, edict; akin to D. ban, Icel. bann, Dan. band, OHG. ban, G. bann, a public proclamation, as of interdiction or excommunication, Gr. fa`nai to say, L. fari to speak, Skr. bhan to speak; cf. F. ban, LL. bannum, of G. origin. [root]86. Cf. Abandon, Fame.]

  1. A public proclamation or edict; a public order or notice, mandatory or prohibitory; a summons by public proclamation.

  2. (Feudal & Mil.) A calling together of the king's (esp. the French king's) vassals for military service; also, the body of vassals thus assembled or summoned. In present usage, in France and Prussia, the most effective part of the population liable to military duty and not in the standing army.

  3. pl. Notice of a proposed marriage, proclaimed in church. See Banns (the common spelling in this sense).

  4. An interdiction, prohibition, or proscription. ``Under ban to touch.''
    --Milton.

  5. A curse or anathema. ``Hecate's ban.''
    --Shak.

  6. A pecuniary mulct or penalty laid upon a delinquent for offending against a ban; as, a mulct paid to a bishop by one guilty of sacrilege or other crimes.

    Ban of the empire (German Hist.), an imperial interdict by which political rights and privileges, as those of a prince, city, or district, were taken away.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

ban

Old English bannan "to summon, command, proclaim," from Proto-Germanic *bannan "proclaim, command, forbid" (cognates: Old High German bannan "to command or forbid under threat of punishment," German bannen "banish, expel, curse"), originally "to speak publicly," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak" (cognates: Old Irish bann "law," Armenian ban "word;" see fame (n.)).\n

\n Main modern sense of "to prohibit" (late 14c.) is from Old Norse cognate banna "to curse, prohibit," and probably in part from Old French ban, which meant "outlawry, banishment," among other things (see banal) and was a borrowing from Germanic. The sense evolution in Germanic was from "speak" to "proclaim a threat" to (in Norse, German, etc.) "curse."\n

\nThe Germanic root, borrowed in Latin and French, has been productive: banish, bandit, contraband, etc. Related: Banned; banning. Banned in Boston dates from 1920s, in allusion to the excessive zeal and power of that city's Watch and Ward Society.

ban

"governor of Croatia," from Serbo-Croatian ban "lord, master, ruler," from Persian ban "prince, lord, chief, governor," related to Sanskrit pati "guards, protects." Hence banat "district governed by a ban," with Latinate suffix -atus. The Persian word got into Slavic perhaps via the Avars.

ban

"edict of prohibition," c.1300, "proclamation or edict of an overlord," from Old English (ge)bann "proclamation, summons, command" and Old French ban, both from Germanic; see ban (v.).

WordNet

ban

  1. n. a decree that prohibits something [syn: prohibition, proscription]

  2. 100 bani equal 1 leu

  3. 100 bani equal 1 leu

  4. an official prohibition or edict against something [syn: banning, forbiddance, forbidding]

  5. a bachelor's degree in nursing [syn: Bachelor of Arts in Nursing]

  6. [also: banning, banned, bani (pl)]

ban

  1. v. prohibit especially by legal means or social pressure; "Smoking is banned in this building"

  2. forbid the public distribution of ( a movie or a newspaper) [syn: censor]

  3. ban from a place of residence, as for punishment [syn: banish]

  4. expel from a community or group [syn: banish, ostracize, ostracise, shun, cast out, blackball]

  5. [also: banning, banned, bani (pl)]

Wiktionary

ban

init. British Approved Name

Usage examples of "ban".

Because representations attack it at what we call the affective phase and cause a resulting experience, a disturbance, to which disturbance is joined the image of threatened evil: this amounts to an affection and Reason seeks to extinguish it, to ban it as destructive to the well-being of the Soul which by the mere absence of such a condition is immune, the one possible cause of affection not being present.

If, as has chanced to others--as chanced, for example, to Mangan-- outcast from home, health and hope, with a charred past and a bleared future, an anchorite without detachment and self-cloistered without self-sufficingness, deposed from a world which he had not abdicated, pierced with thorns which formed no crown, a poet hopeless of the bays and a martyr hopeless of the palm, a land cursed against the dews of love, an exile banned and proscribed even from the innocent arms of childhood--he were burning helpless at the stake of his unquenchable heart, then he might have been inconsolable, then might he have cast the gorge at life, then have cowered in the darkening chamber of his being, tapestried with mouldering hopes, and hearkened to the winds that swept across the illimitable wastes of death.

Baynes family, except the dog, showed up at the ashram and presented themselves to Ban Sar Din.

Baynes, and turned to Ban Sar Din to ask if the ashram offered yoga programs, breathing, discussion groups, chanting, and had guest speakers.

Ban Sar Din ran out into the ashram from his holy office in the back, dumped out a batch of yellow handkerchiefs, and ran back to his office.

Ban Sar Din said, wondering what would happen if she got picked up for murder alone, without another member of the ashram around to kill her before she could spill the beans to the police.

Ban Sar Din, but he looked to the back of the ashram, even as he filled his other pocket with more jewels and cash.

An F in the Age of Socrates would have the same consequence: he would be banned from athletics for a semester.

When the king of Prussia was put under the ban of the empire, the several princes who compose that body were required, by the decree of the Aulic council, as we observed before, to furnish their respective contingents against him.

As little formidable were the denunciations of the emperor, who had, by a decree of the Aulic council, communicated to the diet certain mandates, issued in the month of August in the preceding year, on pain of the ban of the empire, with avocatory letters annexed against the king of Great Britain, elector of Hanover, and the other princes acting in concert with the king of Prussia.

Since the Avion government had banned Kin-sha ten years ago, any use of it would be disastrous or worse.

And, taking it for Nature, place in ban Our Mother, as a Power wanton-willed, The shame and baffler of the soul of man, The recreant, reptilious.

This weeks message was nothing unusual, to the Kingpriests disappointment The banditry in the hills continued, the robbers sacking occasional caravans that dared to break the ban he had placed on trade with the Taoli.

Bass had been repeatedly assured by knowledgeable-sounding men that the River Ban, though too shallow the most of its length for ships of the battle line or large merchanters, would easily pass doggers, howkers, bugalets, belandres, pinks, luggers, and all manner of smaller craft.

But they came out in a widening throng, Elam and Dav, Ewin and Aram, Eward Candwin and Buel Dowtry, Hu and Tad the stablemen from the Winespring Inn, Ban and Tell and the Companions riding with that Banner still.