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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

arm

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a chair leg/arm/back/seat
▪ The chair leg has broken.
an armed attack
▪ Armed attacks against Israeli settlements are on the increase.
an armed clash (=involving the use of weapons)
▪ The violence could soon become armed clashes and even a war.
an armed convoy (=carrying weapons)
▪ a heavily armed convoy of three vehicles
an armed gang (=with guns)
▪ An armed gang stole jewels worth more than five million pounds.
an armed terrorist
▪ They were gunned down by armed terrorists outside their hotel.
an arms embargo (=one that stops weapons being sold or sent to a country)
▪ Ministers knew that the arms embargo was being broken.
an arms/weapons deal (=one which involves selling weapons)
▪ A number of recent arms deals have embarrassed the government.
arm candy
▪ He had just invited me along as arm candy.
armed forces
Armed guards
Armed guards were posted by the exit.
armed insurrection
▪ an armed insurrection against the party in power
armed police
▪ Armed police surrounded the house.
armed rebellion
▪ This injustice has produced armed rebellion.
armed revolt (=one in which weapons are used)
▪ Somalis living just across the Ethiopian border rose up in armed revolt.
armed robbery (=robbery using a gun)
▪ He received a 10 year prison sentence for armed robbery.
armed uprising
▪ an armed uprising
arm/leg/stomach etc muscles
▪ Her leg muscles ached after the run.
arms cache
▪ a large arms cache
arms control
arms control (=control of the amount of weapons a country has)
▪ an agreement on arms control
arms race
▪ the nuclear arms race
arms reduction
▪ They held talks about further arms reductions.
arms/oil/drug etc shipment
▪ an illegal arms shipment
as long as your arm (=a very long list)
▪ He owes money to a list of people as long as your arm.
babe in arms (=one that has to be carried)
be armed with a knife (=have it with you)
▪ One of the men was armed with a knife.
be under (police/armed etc) guard (=to be guarded by a group of people)
▪ He was taken to hospital, where he is now under police guard.
chance...arm (=take a risk by doing something which may fail)
▪ She’d never played before, but she was ready to chance her arm.
clasp sb/sth in your hands/arms
▪ She clasped the photograph in her hands.
clasp your hands/arms around/behind sth
▪ Fenella leaned forward, clasping her hands around her knees.
coat of arms
comrade in arms
cost an arm and a leg (=have a price that is much too high)
▪ A skiing holiday needn’t cost you an arm and a leg.
flung...arms
▪ She flung her arms round Louise.
fracture your leg/arm/hip etc
▪ He fractured his right leg during training.
heavily armed
▪ thousands of heavily armed troops
hold sth in your hand/arms
▪ He was holding a knife in one hand.
▪ I held the baby in my arms.
hug your knees/arms/legs etc
▪ Sarah sat on the floor, hugging her knees.
hurt your arm/leg/nose etc
▪ He hurt his knee playing football.
lay down...arms
▪ The terrorists were urged to lay down their arms.
lift your hand/arm/leg etc
▪ She lifted her hand to knock on the door once again.
▪ Pam lifted her shoulders in a little shrug.
linking arms (=putting his arm around her arm)
▪ He walked with her, linking arms.
lose an arm/leg/eye etc
▪ He lost his leg in a motorcycle accident.
military/violent/armed confrontation
▪ Japan seemed unlikely to risk military confrontation with Russia.
nuclear arms race
▪ the nuclear arms race
outstretched arms/hands/fingers
▪ She ran to meet them with outstretched arms.
poke sb in the eye/arm/ribs etc
▪ Be careful with that umbrella or you’ll poke someone in the eye.
sb’s good eye/arm/leg etc (=the one that is not damaged)
▪ He sat up, supporting himself on his good arm.
slender legs/arms/fingers etc
stab sb in the heart/arm etc
▪ She had been stabbed in the chest repeatedly.
strategic arms/weapons (=weapons designed to reach an enemy country from your own)
▪ strategic nuclear missiles
tap sb on the shoulder/arm/chest etc
▪ He turned as someone tapped him on the shoulder.
the armed forces (=a country’s military organizations, including the army, navy, and air force)
▪ Israel refused to withdraw its armed forces from the area.
the arms/timber/book etc trade
▪ Britain is heavily involved in the arms trade.
the long arm of the law
▪ He won’t escape the long arm of the law.
thin arms/legs/lips etc
▪ He has long thin hands.
tie sb’s hands/arms/legs/feet
▪ One of them tied her hands behind her back.
touch sb on the arm/leg etc
▪ A hand touched her on the shoulder.
welcomed...with open arms (=in a very friendly way)
▪ His family welcomed me with open arms.
welcome...with open arms
▪ We would welcome any advice or suggestions with open arms.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
broken
▪ This patient I have to see is a monkey with a suspected broken arm.
▪ He'd been hit by a car three weeks before, and he had a broken arm and pelvis.
▪ The schoolboy sent back to class with a broken arm.
▪ They stepped forward, and raised Chant by his broken arms.
▪ The boy with the broken arm had fainted once; now he was sitting against a wall, crying.
▪ Its tail dangled useless, like the broken arm of a bendy rubber doll.
▪ Bernice could see Thomas trying to prise his hands apart, but his broken arm proved to be a burden.
▪ Along with the souvenirs, he brought home a reminder of a broken arm.
left
▪ His left arm was jammed tight against the side of the seat.
▪ I was tired by the time I got home and my left arm ached.
▪ Yes, my left arm was trapped.
▪ As much as his left arm, Estes has used his leveled head to get him to the All- Star Game.
▪ Her left arm was locked to her side, because her shoulder was extremely painful.
▪ With his left arm he gave Billie a clumsy and rather inebriated embrace, and tipped his glass to Albert.
▪ She would scream if anyone came near her left arm, and she cried at night, begging for painkillers.
▪ His own place was represented by a tattoo he wore on his left arm.
long
▪ The long slender arms are flexible, unlike the starfish shown previously.
▪ Five minutes passed and several police cars careened by. long black arms swung threateningly at the parked cars.
▪ The disk is usually scaled, the arms are very long and the arm spines are short and erect.
▪ She walks down the line, awkwardly hugging each player with her long, bony arms.
▪ The dorsal arm spines are the longest nearly two arm segments in length, the ventral arm spines are much shorter.
▪ Rufus had impossibly long arms with the same type of musculature as Hector and Mr Lewis.
▪ Their long arms are particularly well adapted to life in trees.
▪ They are tall and lean, with long arms and explosive quickness.
open
▪ He greeted Riley with open arms.
▪ You walk in here and you expect to be welcomed with open arms.
▪ Did I welcome him with open arms?
▪ Not that the profession was necessarily going to welcome me into the fold with open arms.
▪ And if the turnout was any indication, the parish was welcoming them with open arms.
▪ Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old.
right
▪ Reach out and slowly lift the right arm and left leg off the floor, keeping the movement controlled.
▪ She had survived polio, but her right leg was weak and deformed, and her right arm dangled loosely.
▪ In addition, any weaver caught using illegally dyed yarns could be sentenced to having his right arm cut off.
▪ He lifts his right arm with his left hand to put his elbow on a table.
▪ At fifty-five or sixty degrees he had to brace his right arm against his leg in order to fight the roll.
▪ Serrin was treated for smoke inhalation and burns on his right arm and was listed in serious condition in a Gloucester hospital.
▪ The right training, the right arms, everything that's coming to the surface now.
▪ Out of the corner of my eye I saw him strike out with his right arm and catch Dweetz across the neck.
small
▪ The rapid spread of small arms and light weapons facilitate the recruitment of child soldiers.
▪ Several Third World countries have themselves become suppliers of small arms for such conflicts.
▪ The event is aimed at reducing the carnage caused by the worldwide stockpile of 550m small arms.
▪ At that point, small arms and automatic weapons opened up.
▪ The consensus is that the Kiev government has tightened controls over the small arms trade in recent months.
▪ Billie was so small in his arms, his heart broke for her smallness.
▪ Her frame was small, her arms looked frail and very white against the raw silk.
▪ The round had not landed before small-arms fire broke out all around the perimeter.
strong
▪ Their faces were too strong, their arms were too thick, their shoulders were wrong.
▪ She walked faster, her strong arms swinging her along.
▪ During the 1953 crisis he had operated literally as the strong arm of his father, General Zahedi.
▪ He told me that short, strong arms were good for a boxer.
▪ Each of them is free to have casual encounters outside the strong arms of their love.
▪ I think he has a good strong arm.
▪ For how are we to bring in the corn harvest with all those strong hands and strong arms gone?
▪ Like Aikman, he owns a strong arm and throws accurately.
upper
▪ Her blouse was scooped so low at the front that it left her shoulders and upper arms bare.
▪ The usual treatment involves application of two patches at bedtime to the upper arms, thighs, or abdomen.
▪ One of its shoulder straps had drooped to her upper arm.
▪ Secure at the wrists and upper arms with the rubber bands.
▪ Stretch the upper arm up and over even further than yesterday.
▪ He touched her shoulder, and her upper arm, and the inside of her elbow.
▪ Lean on your elbow and use the upper arm to support you in front.
▪ It is characterised by unsightly lumps and bumps which collect in the thighs, buttocks, hips and upper arms.
■ NOUN
control
▪ They say that it could erode existing arms control agreements and lead to a new arms race.
▪ Bush made an important speech on arms control policy last week in Washington.
▪ We committed ourselves to arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation and to the conclusion of a chemical weapons convention this year.
▪ The two men meet semiannually on trade, arms control and other security issues.
▪ The later stages of arm control involve lifting the hemiplegic arm and controlling it in space while bending and straightening the elbow.
▪ In the new world, arms sales abroad are a more critical problem than superpower arms control.
▪ There is still work to be done on maritime arms control.
dealer
▪ As with most arms dealers payola - commission or bribes - is the key to his living.
▪ Story: A team of secret agents battles double-crossing spies and arms dealers.
▪ Reconditioned Royal Navy ships were turned into Confederate blockade runners by Clydeside arms dealers.
▪ Merchant banks, sugar companies, arms dealers.
▪ But Bond only had a license to kill - arms dealers have something much more lucrative, as Janice Turner discovered.
▪ First, a media sting operation caught several senior government aides taking bribes from arms dealers.
▪ Not unnaturally it was handed to me, now being officially outside the Ministère and a recognised arms dealer.
embargo
▪ That could include traditional diplomacy, peace-monitoring, the placing of tripwire forces on disputed borders and the policing of arms embargoes.
▪ The story starts in 1985, when Britain put an arms embargo on Saddam's military state.
▪ The deal violated international arms embargoes.
race
▪ They can emphasise the danger of a new arms race.
▪ Further, the arms race between the superpowers has escalated still more.
▪ The potential for a destructive arms race is ever present.
▪ The primary danger of war was the irrational arms race and overly hostile relations between the major military powers.
▪ They say that it could erode existing arms control agreements and lead to a new arms race.
▪ The Soviet Union tested its own hydrogen bomb within a year, and the nuclear arms race escalated further.
sale
▪ Its role in backing arms sales is particularly controversial because government insurance is a form of subsidy.
▪ In the new world, arms sales abroad are a more critical problem than superpower arms control.
▪ The declaration exposed him to accusations of hypocrisy after each revelation of arms sales to dubious regimes.
▪ The Independent of July 16 noted that no agreement had been reached on limiting arms sales.
▪ There must be strict control on arms sales to the region.
■ VERB
bear
▪ The total census of the towns comes to just under 300,000 people of whom some 60,000 were capable of bearing arms.
▪ Frequent prohibitions by the government against the bearing of arms had no effect.
▪ This, though he bore one arm in a rough sling, and looked tired and worried out of his slow mind.
▪ John Hostettler, R-Ind., who once suggested that the constitutional right to bear arms included nuclear weapons; and Rep.
▪ Women who choose to find employment in military institutions want therefore to be allowed to bear arms and to fight.
▪ All civilians possessing army-distributed guns must return them and undergo physical and psychological tests to determine their fitness to bear arms.
▪ There is no constitutional right to bear arms.
▪ The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed by law.
break
▪ Six had minor gunshot wounds, the seventh had tripped over a fallen tree and broken an arm.
▪ Next to Billy was little Paul Lazzaro with a broken arm. he was fizzing with rabies.
▪ He must've broken the other arm because the next day he had both arms in plaster.
▪ My husband suffered a broken arm and severe head injuries.
▪ According to hearsay, Bez had managed to break his arm - twice.
▪ Now with broken arm and gory leg he sits sighing and weeping with pain.
▪ I ended up having a fight with him, he broke my arm and I got hit on the head.
▪ Scabbards, broken arms, artillery horses, wrecks of gun carriages, and bloody garments strewed the scene.
cross
▪ If you aren't using flags, cross your arms in front of your body with your right hand clasped over the left.
▪ I laughed, crossed my arms, looked upward again.
▪ Turning off the tape, he lay on the bottom bunk and crossed his arms under his head.
▪ Cantor had been sitting in one corner, legs casually crossed, one arm thrown over the back of the sofa.
▪ Meanwhile - and he crossed his arms as it to underline the point - nobody gets in and nobody gets out.
▪ Still with your arms straight, flex your hands and cross your arms low in front of you, hands together.
▪ Every week we practice leaving our desks quickly, crossing our arms over our heads, lying still on the classroom floor.
fold
▪ She stands back, folds her arms, waits for the message to sink in.
▪ Pat got into the car, buckled the seat belt, folded her arms tight to her chest.
▪ The girl sobs with relief, folding her arms in a fleshy nest on the table top to cry into.
▪ He got the feeling that she folded her arms not to hide herself but as a natural aid to thinking.
▪ The sister folded her arms and shook her head.
▪ Tom folded his arms, put a pleasant expression on his face, and did not try to talk any more.
▪ They fold their arms when they should lift their hand in wrath.
▪ Banjo folded his arms across the front of his Mac West, scowling, not looking at Connors.
hold
▪ He was still holding my arm but there was space between us.
▪ And as for recalling those moments of being held in his arms ... she'd be wise to forget them.
▪ Mr Barraza spent three months teaching me how to stand and move and how to hold my arms with gloves on.
▪ He held out one fat arm and tried to catch a seagull flying low.
▪ Grieving families hold their children in their memories and in their hearts, but no longer can hold them in their arms.
▪ The girl on the right of Lizzy held out her arms and the child tottered towards her.
▪ He would hold her in his arms.
lift
▪ Reach out and slowly lift the right arm and left leg off the floor, keeping the movement controlled.
▪ Ace hadn't consciously lifted her arm and fired the suit's built-in blaster.
▪ A man at port lifted his arm one way and a second at starboard lifted his another.
▪ He lifted one sinewy arm to wave.
▪ Every feather in her boa fluttered and caressed as she lifted her arm and her glass.
▪ Annie lifted me in her arms so I could look down.
link
▪ Lady Isabella linked her arm through his.
▪ Julia Patterson as she linked arms with two other senators and escaped down the marble stairs.
▪ Madeleine linked her arm into Louis's.
▪ The two-minute video shows the protesters casually entering the office before linking arms through the tubes.
▪ Margaret linked her arm through mine and we walked to the zebra-crossing.
▪ Athelstan linked his arm through that of the coroner and they carefully made their way down Cheapside.
▪ Outside in the street Maggie linked arms with Laura.
▪ He walked between us, linking arms.
raise
▪ Do 20 walking jogs, raising the arms up and down.Then jog properly for as long as possible.
▪ Then she raised her arms like a victorious swimmer, stretched toward the ceiling, and came back.
▪ With hands interlinked behind, raise the arms 30 times.
▪ He sat me up and raised my arms over my head again and again.
▪ He half raised his arm to draw her attention, and thought better of it.
▪ Suppose that a prefrontal patient is in bed with his arms under the covers and you ask him to raise his arm.
▪ Inevitably, he raised his arm and pulled her down, so that their lips met.
▪ Shooter Brian Evans can barely raise his ailing arm.
stretch
▪ Now push and stretch that arm just a little further and hold for 1 second.
▪ I could stretch both arms toward the sides of the chamber without touching them.
▪ He stretched out his arms but had no room to manoeuvre.
▪ Denver stretches out her right arm and takes a step or two.
▪ He then stretches out his arms and attempts to grab the sole of each foot.
▪ In her sleep Alcyone moaned and stretched her arms out to clasp him.
▪ Mr Montesinos's influence stretched into every arm of public life.
▪ Manshin Anjima stretched her arms above her head, then began to braid her sparse hair.
take
▪ As you do so, take your arms up and then down to rest on the floor above your head.
▪ Father stood and took her arm.
▪ She took his arm firmly, just above the elbow, and jerked him half way off his stool.
▪ They may even locally have taken up arms for the Cathar cause.
▪ Evans had taken Gwen's arm to help her circumnavigate a frozen puddle.
▪ Bobby took my arm and steered me toward the men.
▪ Stand with feet comfortably apart and take your arms out to the sides.
▪ Sarah clapped abstractedly when he finished and took him by the arm.
twist
▪ So me Dad twists his arm a bit, like.
▪ He twisted her arm behind her back and kicked her hard.
▪ Anger gave her an added surge of strength, and she twisted her arm sharply downwards and broke his grip.
▪ He knew how to get along with people, how to twist arms without causing fractures.
▪ Rhythmically twist both arms over and back, over and back.
▪ How many times can the shoe companies twist the arms of their stars to keep them coming to the Olympics?
▪ It would seek to twist Government's arm to ensure that appropriate management was bought in.
▪ One of the owners grabbed him, another twisted my arm behind my back.
wave
▪ Kip waved his arm down, without looking back.-I want to know what your cause is, man.
▪ I put the bracelet on and waved my arm to show them.
▪ The figures moved around them, waving their arms in a coordinated movement towards each other.
▪ Can you read me?... Wave your arms if you can hear me...
▪ He stepped out into the road and waved his arms.
▪ He waved his arms and the cheers grew.
wrap
▪ At least he clung to me and let me wrap my arms around him.
▪ Isabel shuddered at the memory and wrapped her arms about her waist.
▪ She jumped in, wrapping her arms around him.
▪ The pain in the region of her heart was so intense that she wrapped her arms around herself involuntarily.
▪ She undid the clasp and wrapped her arms around him.
▪ He dropped the soap and wrapped his arms around her, they slid against each other, their skin slippery and sensual.
▪ After handing her his bundle, he reached back and wrapped his arms around the back of her knees.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(with) arms akimbo
▪ Anatole stood arms akimbo, challenging me.
▪ Arms akimbo, she made herself ready for battle.
▪ Aunt Bedelia stood at the gate with her arms akimbo, then Otley and Elinor joined her.
▪ He stood, arms akimbo, looking around in the musty gloom.
▪ I half wanted him to fall, legs and arms akimbo, flowers drifting down after him.
▪ It was accompanied by a photograph of Blufton standing - arms akimbo - in front of a grey smudge of masonry.
▪ Meanwhile, a silhouetted figure floats in the distance, arms akimbo.
▪ That's Aunt Bedelia with her arms akimbo again.
a shot in the arm
▪ The new factory will give the local economy a real shot in the arm.
▪ Coming back will be a shot in the arm.
▪ In 1922 it received a shot in the arm through a large subsidy from the Central Committee.
▪ It now had the effect of a shot in the arm.
▪ It was like a shot in the arm for us, and our tiredness fell away.
▪ On the Conservative side, the decision of Callaghan not to hold an election came as a shot in the arm.
brothers in arms
fold sb in your arms
▪ Lee went to her and folded her in his arms.
fold your arms
▪ George stood silently with his arms folded.
▪ Banjo folded his arms across the front of his Mac West, scowling, not looking at Connors.
▪ But the moment passed and the Robemaker had folded his arms, the deep sleeves hanging down.
▪ Denver climbed up on the bed and folded her arms under her apron.
▪ He folded his arms, admiring the two glittering rings on his right hand.
▪ He got the feeling that she folded her arms not to hide herself but as a natural aid to thinking.
▪ Mr Bumble put down his hat, unbuttoned his coat, folded his arms, and sat back in his chair.
▪ Ruthie folded her arms, as if to emphasize her lack of responsibility for the shop she was minding.
▪ The woman folded her arms and became silent in a way that swept Lois with feelings of admiration.
in the arms of Morpheus
lock arms
▪ Fifty students locked arms to block the entrance to the building.
▪ This is not to say that Brownmiller has written a sanguine portrait of sisters locking arms in struggle.
melt into sb's arms/embrace
▪ Would they melt into each other's arms?
present arms
press sb's hand/arm
put your hand/foot/arm out
▪ Everyone puts his hand out, from cabinet ministers to loan underwriters.
▪ He put his hand out and there was Lily, quiet and warm beside him.
▪ He put his hand out, touching his father's cheek.
▪ Minna put her hands out and I handed her the divorce.
▪ She tottered, and put her arms out.
▪ Vern put his hand out this time.
▪ When she put her hand out, trying to rise, she skittled a row of bottles.
shoulder arms
small arms
▪ At that point, small arms and automatic weapons opened up.
▪ Several Third World countries have themselves become suppliers of small arms for such conflicts.
▪ That does not include heaps of smaller arms and ammunition.
▪ The consensus is that the Kiev government has tightened controls over the small arms trade in recent months.
▪ The rebels have put up fierce resistance with small arms and rocket-propelled grenades.
▪ Then he opened up with small arms.
the crook of your arm
▪ He carried his jacket in the crook of his arm.
▪ Carey stood up, the fish held in the crook of his arm, as you would hold an infant.
▪ His ripped jacket was draped over the crook of his arm.
▪ Mortified, she turned her face and hid it in the crook of her arm.
▪ One of them was cradling a sub-machine-gun in the crook of his arm.
▪ Thérèse clasped the biscuit tin in the crook of her arm.
▪ The army ride round in jeeps, rifles in the crooks of their arms.
▪ When he returned, he was carrying four good-sized rocks in the crook of his arm.
▪ With a big sign she lay her head in the crook of his arm and closed her eyes.
the long arm of sb/sth
▪ How far are you prepared to stretch the long arm of coincidence?
▪ I managed two months at large before I felt the long arm of the law on my shoulder once again.
▪ Oct-11a is located in a region of mouse chromosome 9 homologous with the long arm of human chromosome 11.
▪ Roy tries an overhead pass, but the long arm of a Stanford player plucks it out of the air.
▪ The old woman has turned into the long arm of her family.
twist sb's arm
▪ "Go on, have another drink." "Oh well, if you twist my arm."
▪ I'm sure he would never have come if I hadn't twisted his arm a little.
▪ We had to twist her arm to get her to come.
welcome/greet sb/sth with open arms
▪ And if the turnout was any indication, the parish was welcoming them with open arms.
▪ Did I welcome him with open arms?
▪ He greeted Riley with open arms.
▪ He welcomed them with open arms, talked freely, played draughts with the younger and learned tables from the elder.
▪ Mind, I welcomed them with open arms because it meant I could stay off school.
▪ Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old.
▪ Would you welcome them with open arms?
would give anything/a lot/your right arm etc for sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Dana has a broken arm.
▪ Epson America is the United States marketing arm of a Japanese company.
▪ Jens' mother put her arms around him.
▪ Pat was carrying a large box under his arm.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He died in the arms of a passing motorist.
▪ He tore past the carousels, raced around columns and flew back into my arms.
▪ Later yet we are herded down to the basement, told to crouch and to cover our heads with our arms.
▪ Soon she would lie down in the arms of a stronger lover than Tom would ever be and fall asleep.
▪ The declaration exposed him to accusations of hypocrisy after each revelation of arms sales to dubious regimes.
▪ The lateral arm plates also carry a series of long bristle-like spines, dorsal to the arm spines.
▪ There are 5 short arm spines, the longest is scarcely equal in length to one segment.
▪ Thwarted, he then embraced her stiffly before taking the baby in his arms under the watchful eye of his wife.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(with) arms akimbo
▪ Anatole stood arms akimbo, challenging me.
▪ Arms akimbo, she made herself ready for battle.
▪ Aunt Bedelia stood at the gate with her arms akimbo, then Otley and Elinor joined her.
▪ He stood, arms akimbo, looking around in the musty gloom.
▪ I half wanted him to fall, legs and arms akimbo, flowers drifting down after him.
▪ It was accompanied by a photograph of Blufton standing - arms akimbo - in front of a grey smudge of masonry.
▪ Meanwhile, a silhouetted figure floats in the distance, arms akimbo.
▪ That's Aunt Bedelia with her arms akimbo again.
a shot in the arm
▪ The new factory will give the local economy a real shot in the arm.
▪ Coming back will be a shot in the arm.
▪ In 1922 it received a shot in the arm through a large subsidy from the Central Committee.
▪ It now had the effect of a shot in the arm.
▪ It was like a shot in the arm for us, and our tiredness fell away.
▪ On the Conservative side, the decision of Callaghan not to hold an election came as a shot in the arm.
brothers in arms
in the arms of Morpheus
small arms
▪ At that point, small arms and automatic weapons opened up.
▪ Several Third World countries have themselves become suppliers of small arms for such conflicts.
▪ That does not include heaps of smaller arms and ammunition.
▪ The consensus is that the Kiev government has tightened controls over the small arms trade in recent months.
▪ The rebels have put up fierce resistance with small arms and rocket-propelled grenades.
▪ Then he opened up with small arms.
the armed forces
▪ A new government minister is now responsible for the armed forces.
▪ Measures will be taken to help modernize the country's armed forces.
the crook of your arm
▪ He carried his jacket in the crook of his arm.
▪ Carey stood up, the fish held in the crook of his arm, as you would hold an infant.
▪ His ripped jacket was draped over the crook of his arm.
▪ Mortified, she turned her face and hid it in the crook of her arm.
▪ One of them was cradling a sub-machine-gun in the crook of his arm.
▪ Thérèse clasped the biscuit tin in the crook of her arm.
▪ The army ride round in jeeps, rifles in the crooks of their arms.
▪ When he returned, he was carrying four good-sized rocks in the crook of his arm.
▪ With a big sign she lay her head in the crook of his arm and closed her eyes.
the long arm of sb/sth
▪ How far are you prepared to stretch the long arm of coincidence?
▪ I managed two months at large before I felt the long arm of the law on my shoulder once again.
▪ Oct-11a is located in a region of mouse chromosome 9 homologous with the long arm of human chromosome 11.
▪ Roy tries an overhead pass, but the long arm of a Stanford player plucks it out of the air.
▪ The old woman has turned into the long arm of her family.
welcome/greet sb/sth with open arms
▪ And if the turnout was any indication, the parish was welcoming them with open arms.
▪ Did I welcome him with open arms?
▪ He greeted Riley with open arms.
▪ He welcomed them with open arms, talked freely, played draughts with the younger and learned tables from the elder.
▪ Mind, I welcomed them with open arms because it meant I could stay off school.
▪ Now we welcome death with open arms, especially when we are old.
▪ Would you welcome them with open arms?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Roman candles, squibs and rockets were already in the shops and the protesters had armed themselves.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Arm

Arm \Arm\, n. [See Arms.] (Mil.)

  1. A branch of the military service; as, the cavalry arm was made efficient.

  2. A weapon of offense or defense; an instrument of warfare; -- commonly in the pl.

Arm

Arm \Arm\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Armed; p. pr. & vb. n. Arming.] [OE. armen, F. armer, fr. L. armare, fr. arma, pl., arms. See arms.]

  1. To take by the arm; to take up in one's arms. [Obs.]

    And make him with our pikes and partisans A grave: come, arm him.
    --Shak.

    Arm your prize; I know you will not lose him.
    --Two N. Kins.

  2. To furnish with arms or limbs. [R.]

    His shoulders broad and strong, Armed long and round.
    --Beau. & Fl.

  3. To furnish or equip with weapons of offense or defense; as, to arm soldiers; to arm the country.

    Abram . . . armed his trained servants.
    --Gen. xiv. 1

  4. 4. To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency; as, to arm the hit of a sword; to arm a hook in angling.

  5. Fig.: To furnish with means of defense; to prepare for resistance; to fortify, in a moral sense.

    Arm yourselves . . . with the same mind.
    --1 Pet. iv. 1.

    To arm a magnet, to fit it with an armature.

Arm

Arm \Arm\, n. [AS. arm, earm; akin to OHG. aram, G., D., Dan., & Sw. arm, Icel. armr, Goth. arms, L. armus arm, shoulder, and prob. to Gr. ? joining, joint, shoulder, fr. the root ? to join, to fit together; cf. Slav. rame. ?. See Art, Article.]

  1. The limb of the human body which extends from the shoulder to the hand; also, the corresponding limb of a monkey.

  2. Anything resembling an arm; as,

    1. The fore limb of an animal, as of a bear.

    2. A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.

    3. A branch of a tree.

    4. A slender part of an instrument or machine, projecting from a trunk, axis, or fulcrum; as, the arm of a steelyard.

    5. (Naut) The end of a yard; also, the part of an anchor which ends in the fluke.

    6. An inlet of water from the sea.

    7. A support for the elbow, at the side of a chair, the end of a sofa, etc.

  3. Fig.: Power; might; strength; support; as, the secular arm; the arm of the law.

    To whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?
    --Isa. lii. 1.

    Arm's end, the end of the arm; a good distance off.
    --Dryden.

    Arm's length, the length of the arm.

    Arm's reach, reach of the arm; the distance the arm can reach.

    To go (or walk) arm in arm, to go with the arm or hand of one linked in the arm of another. ``When arm in armwe went along.''
    --Tennyson.

    To keep at arm's length, to keep at a distance (literally or figuratively); not to allow to come into close contact or familiar intercourse.

    To work at arm's length, to work disadvantageously.

Arm

Arm \Arm\, v. i. To provide one's self with arms, weapons, or means of attack or resistance; to take arms. `` 'Tis time to arm.''
--Shak.

Wikipedia

Arm

In human anatomy, the arm is the upper limb of the body, comprising regions between the glenohumeral joint (shoulder joint) and the elbow joint. In common usage the arm extends to the hand. It can be divided into the upper arm (brachium) which extends from the shoulder to the elbow, the forearm (antebrachium) which extends from the elbow to the hand, and the hand (manus). Anatomically the shoulder girdle with bones and corresponding muscles is by definition a part of the arm. The Latin term brachium may refer to both the arm as a whole or to the upper arm on its own.

Arm (disambiguation)

An arm is an upper limb of the body.

Arm or ARM may also refer to:

Arm (geography)

In geography, an arm is a narrow extension, inlet, or smaller reach, of water flowing out from a much larger body of water, such as an ocean, a sea, or a lake. Although different geographically, a sound or bay may also be called an arm.

By extension, a canal arm is a subsidiary branch of a canal or inland waterway.

ARM (novella)

WordNet

arm

  1. v. prepare oneself for a military confrontation; "The U.S. is girding for a conflict in the Middle East"; "troops are building up on the Iraqui border" [syn: build up, fortify, gird] [ant: disarm]

  2. supply with arms; "The U.S. armed the freedom fighters in Afghanistan"

arm

  1. n. a human limb; technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb

  2. any instrument or instrumentality used in fighting or hunting; "he was licensed to carry a weapon" [syn: weapon, weapon system]

  3. an administrative division of some larger or more complex organization; "a branch of Congress" [syn: branch, subdivision]

  4. any projection that is thought to resemble an arm; "the arm of the record player"; "an arm of the sea"; "a branch of the sewer" [syn: branch, limb]

  5. the part of an armchair or sofa that supports the elbow and forearm of a seated person

  6. the part of a garment that is attached at armhole and provides a cloth covering for the arm [syn: sleeve]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

arm

"upper limb," Old English earm "arm," from Proto-Germanic *armaz (cognates: Old Saxon, Danish, Swedish, Middle Dutch, German arm, Old Norse armr, Old Frisian erm), from PIE root *ar- "fit, join" (cognates: Sanskrit irmah "arm," Armenian armukn "elbow," Old Prussian irmo "arm," Greek arthron "a joint," Latin armus "shoulder"). Arm of the sea was in Old English. Arm-twister "powerful persuader" is from 1938. Arm-wrestling is from 1899.\n\nThey wenten arme in arme yfere Into the gardyn

[Chaucer]

arm

"weapon," c.1300, armes (plural) "weapons of a warrior," from Old French armes (plural), "arms, war, warfare," mid-13c., from Latin arma "weapons" (including armor), literally "tools, implements (of war)," from PIE root *ar- "fit, join" (see arm (n.1)). The notion seems to be "that which is fitted together." Meaning "heraldic insignia" (in coat of arms, etc.) is early 14c.; originally they were borne on shields of fully armed knights or barons.

arm

"to furnish with weapons," c.1200, from Old French armer or directly from Latin armare, from arma (see arm (n.2)). Related: Armed; arming.

Wiktionary

arm

n. 1 accelerated reply mail: a service of the United States Postal Service 2 adjustable rate mortgage n. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARM%20architecture

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "arm".

The spider legs of the Aberrant flexed within a few feet of her, each as thick as her arm, encircling the heaving flanks of the thrashing beast.

Her heart pounding so violently she physically shook, Abigail clawed at his arm.

He was a loathsome, gorilla-like thing, with abnormally long arms which I could not help calling fore legs, and a face that conjured up thoughts of unspeakable Congo secrets and tom-tom poundings under an eerie moon.

A roar went up from the crowd on the beach as Abo turned the shark over to the slaughterers and held up his arms in triumph.

And withal they saw men all armed coming from out the High House, who went down to the Bridge and abode there.

And in those times it was well to have the strong arms and sharp blades of any fighters available, for the Lowlands to the north were all aboil and the border was all aflame from end to end.

A State statute which forbids bodies of men to associate together as military organizations, or to drill or parade with arms in cities and towns unless authorized by law, does not abridge the right of the people to keep and bear arms.

And there were problems with these votes, since the Sem-inole County Canvassing Board had allowed Republican Party volunteers to fill in missing data on absentee-ballot applications completed by registered Republicansa violation of Florida lawand many overseas absentee ballots from members of the armed forces lacked the postmarks required by law.

One tape, in particular, featured a young girl hung up by her arms from a beam in a cellar and abused by two men, one black, one white, while she is helpless.

These fugitives, who fled before the Turkish arms, passed the Tanais and Borysthenes, and boldly advanced into the heart of Poland and Germany, violating the law of nations, and abusing the rights of victory.

It was all a great big carnival freak show The federal government was the Man with One Hundred Arms, and Glenn Abies was the barker.

If it was just her arm, then Abies with his military background could treat her for days if necessary.

The captain raised an arm and called over Academician Pael, First Officer Till, and Jeru, the commissary assigned to the ship.

When I saw Nanette in my arms, beaming with love, and Marton near the bed, holding a candle, with her eyes reproaching us with ingratitude because we did not speak to her, who, by accepting my first caresses, had encouraged her sister to follow her example, I realized all my happiness.

When Ace spotted the old cabin he saw an elderly man about to enter it, his arms full of firewood.