Find the word definition

Wikipedia

Aper

Aper may refer to:

  • Aper (grammarian), c. 1st-century BCE
  • Marcus Aper, Roman orator
  • Gaius Septimius Severus Aper (ca. 175–211/212), a Roman statesman
  • Lucius Flavius Aper (d. 284), a Roman general
  • Trosius Aper, grammarian and Latin tutor to Marcus Aurelius
  • Arrius Aper, son-in-law of emperor Numerian
  • Aprus (d. 507), bishop of Toul
  • Aprus of Sens (fl. 7th century), a French saint

Aper (grammarian)

Aper was a Greek grammarian, who lived in ancient Rome in the time of the emperor Tiberius. He belonged to the school of Aristarchus of Samothrace. He was a strenuous opponent of the grammarian Didymus Chalcenterus, and he wrote numerous polemical works attacking this author. One of the students of Didymus, Heraclides Ponticus the Younger, wrote works in defense of his master, and attacking Aper.

Some scholars have hypothesized that the reading of "Aper" is incorrect here, especially seeing as our information on him is so scant, and it is likely another grammarian is meant, perhaps Apion.

WordNet

aper

n. someone who copies the words or behavior of another [syn: copycat, imitator, emulator, ape]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Aper

Aper \Ap"er\, n. One who apes. [1913 Webster] ||

Wiktionary

aper

n. Someone who apes something

Usage examples of "aper".

Docles seized the opportunity, accusing the Praetorian Prefect, a man called Arrius Aper, of having poisoned him, and executing him on the spot.

Docles seized the opportunity, accusing the Praetorian Prefect, a man called Arrius Aper, of having poisoned him, and executing him on the spot.

If Bister were one of these fabulous apers – an Xik reconstructed by surgery and every available form of psycho-training to pass as a Confed man – that would explain a lot.

The administration of all affairs, civil as well as military, was devolved on Arrius Aper, the Praetorian praefect, who to the power of his important office added the honor of being father-in-law to Numerian.

The ramjets were hooked into the last pair of nerve trunks, the nerves which once moved his legs, and dozens of finer nerves in those trunks sensed and regulated fuel feed, ram temperature, differential acceleration, intake aper- ture dilation, and spark pulse.

Maybe these planet bound settlers were more open to such imaginative flights – as the existence of an aper among them – than were the service officers trained to meet the nonproven with wary disbelief.