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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Aged

Age \Age\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Aged; p. pr. & vb. n. Aging.] To grow aged; to become old; to show marks of age; as, he grew fat as he aged.

They live one hundred and thirty years, and never age for all that.
--Holland.

I am aging; that is, I have a whitish, or rather a light-colored, hair here and there.
--Landor.

Aged

Aged \A"ged\ ([=a]"j[e^]d), a.

  1. Old; having lived long; having lived almost to or beyond the usual time allotted to that species of being; as, an aged man; an aged oak.

  2. Belonging to old age. ``Aged cramps.''
    --Shak.

  3. ([=a]"j[e^]d or [=a]jd) Having a certain age; at the age of; having lived; as, a man aged forty years.

WordNet

aged

  1. adj. advanced in years; (`aged' is pronounced as two syllables); "aged members of the society"; "elderly residents could remember the construction of the first skyscraper"; "senior citizen" [syn: elderly, older, senior]

  2. at an advanced stage of erosion (pronounced as one syllable); "aged rocks"

  3. having attained a specific age; (`aged' is pronounced as one syllable); "aged ten"; "ten years of age" [syn: aged(a), of age(p)]

  4. of wines, fruit, cheeses; having reached a desired or final condition; (`aged' pronounced as one syllable); "mature well-aged cheeses" [syn: ripened]

  5. (used of tobacco) aging as a preservative process (`aged' is pronounced as one syllable) [syn: cured]

  6. n. people who are old; "special arrangements were available for the aged" [ant: young]

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

aged

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
die aged 35/50 etc
▪ Her father died aged 84.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Children aged 10-plus will have their own Sunday lunchtime programme.
▪ He established that the body which was badly decomposed was that of a male aged between 16 and 25.
II.adjective
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Among Anselm's contemporary bishops, Samson, the aged bishop of Worcester, represented the former.
▪ Children aged 10-plus will have their own Sunday lunchtime programme.
▪ Half blind and so rapidly aged.
▪ He established that the body which was badly decomposed was that of a male aged between 16 and 25.
▪ The aged naturalist was thus kept in touch with London affairs when compelled to stay in Essex on account of ill health and slender means.
Wiktionary

aged

  1. 1 old. 2 undergo the effects of time, improving as a result. alt. (context uncountable English) Old people, collectively. n. (context uncountable English) Old people, collectively. prep. Having the age of. (primarily non-US) v

  2. (en-past of: age)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

aged

"having lived long," mid-15c., past participle adjective from age (v.). Meaning "having been allowed to get old" (of cheese, etc.) is by 1873. Meaning "of the age of" is from 1630s. Aged Parent is from "Great Expectations" (1860-61).

Usage examples of "aged".

Thereafter as the night aged, they were shown to a sleeping chamber, which albeit not richly decked, or plenished with precious things, was most dainty clean, and sweet smelling, and strewn with flowers, so that the night was sweet to them in a chamber of love.

Professor Webb had taken a careful phonetic copy from an aged angekok or wizard-priest, expressing the sounds in Roman letters as best he knew how.

The only things that pegged him as an aged retiree were his work-gnarled, leathery, slightly arthritic, somehow ancient hands .

The two heads, one hoary and aged and the other young and bright, leaned together as the duke of Avaria and the duchess of Fesse bent close in intimate conversation The door closed, cutting them off, and Hanna felt rushed along as Hugh led his retinue at a brisk pace under shaded porticos and out across the blistering hot courtyard that separated the regnal palace from the one where the skopos dwelled.

When the old bibliomaniac died, aged eighty, Halliwell was energetic in repairing the roof of Middle Hill, finding a buyer for it, and breaking the entail on the estate.

Two of them had been on the foredeck when the Biter boys had come on board, and to tell the truth they looked pretty sick, while the other four rounded up by Sankey had been let go again, two white-faced and yonderly, one aged sixty if a day, the last one with one arm and a twisted leg.

But when I look into a glass, I see there an aged stranger, sapped and sagged and blemished and enfeebled by the corroding rusts of five and sixty years.

In his private room at Rosedale Bernard Boulting, aged eighty-two, sat in bed, his hair shining and crisply parted, his face like crinkled paper.

He was pondering a new excuse when he happened to notice Master Cadge, aged nine, Thomas Cadge, Jr.

It was alarming to see how much Cailleach had aged in the past five years.

Just then Irene came in with her father, who had aged to such an extent that I should never have known him in the street.

Kenmore, once a research scientist at a government-owned facility in twenty-first-century America, now Archbishop of York in this world into which he and a companion had projected themselves almost two hundred years before, slumped back into his padded and canopied cathedra chair and took a long draught of spicy mulled canary wine, for the night was chill for summer, and after so long even a man who had been treated with the longevity serum still aged somewhat and felt the effects of that process on cold nights.

The latter property he appears to have transferred to the front of the old brown landau, where the aged coachman, with nose as flat as the ace of clubs, sits, transfixed and rigid as the curls of his caxon, from three till six every Sunday evening, urging on a cabbage-fed pair of ancient prods, which no exertion of the venerable Jehu has been able for the last seven years to provoke into a trot from Hyde park gate to that of Cumberland and back again.

They had laid siege to Crolle, and had made considerable progress with the siege, when the Spanish army, under command of Mondragon, the aged governor of Antwerp, marched to its relief.

This Le Duc of mine was a Spaniard, aged eighteen, a sharp fellow, whom I valued highly, especially because he did my hair better than anyone else.