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The Collaborative International Dictionary
abaca

Manila hemp \Manila hemp\ n.

  1. A fibrous material obtained from the abaca plant ( Musa textilis), a plant allied to the banana, growing in the Philippine and other East India islands; -- called also by the native name abaca. From it matting, canvas, ropes, and cables are made.

    Syn: Manilla hemp, abaca.

  2. A Philippine plant ( Musa textilis) having leafstalks that yield Manila hemp used for rope and paper etc.; called also the abaca.

abaca

Manila hemp \Manila hemp\ n.

  1. A fibrous material obtained from the abaca plant ( Musa textilis), a plant allied to the banana, growing in the Philippine and other East India islands; -- called also by the native name abaca. From it matting, canvas, ropes, and cables are made.

    Syn: Manilla hemp, abaca.

  2. A Philippine plant ( Musa textilis) having leafstalks that yield Manila hemp used for rope and paper etc.; called also the abaca.

Wiktionary
abaca

n. 1 (taxlink Musa textilis species noshow=1), a species of banana tree native to the Philippines grown for its textile and papermaking fibre. (First attested in the mid 18th century.)(R:SOED5: page=2) 2 (context uncountable English) The fiber of this plant, used in rope. (First attested in the mid 18th century.)

WordNet
abaca
  1. n: a kind of hemp obtained from the abaca plant in the Philippines [syn: Manila hemp, Manilla hemp]

  2. Philippine banana tree having leafstalks that yield Manila hemp used for rope and paper etc [syn: Manila hemp, Musa textilis]

Wikipedia
Abacá

Abacá ( ; ), binomial name Musa textilis, is a species of banana native to the Philippines, grown as a commercial crop in the Philippines, Ecuador, and Costa Rica. The plant, also known as Manila hemp, has great economic importance, being harvested for its fiber, also called Manila hemp, extracted from the leaf-stems. The plant grows to , and averages about . The fiber was originally used for making twines and ropes; now most is pulped and used in a variety of specialized paper products including tea bags, filter paper and banknotes. It is classified as a hard fiber, along with coir, henequin and sisal.

Abacá

Abacá ( ; ), binomial name Musa textilis, is a species of banana native to the Philippines, grown as a commercial crop in the Philippines, Ecuador, and Costa Rica. The plant, also known as Manila hemp, has great economic importance, being harvested for its fiber, also called Manila hemp, extracted from the leaf-stems. The plant grows to , and averages about . The fiber was originally used for making twines and ropes; now most is pulped and used in a variety of specialized paper products including tea bags, filter paper and banknotes. It is classified as a hard fiber, along with coir, henequin and sisal.

Usage examples of "abaca".

He got out henequen cable-laid rope, an assortment of ply and yarn goods, and some superlative slender abaca fiber rope.

The command car whisked by an abaca plantation, with mile after mile of lush green bananalike abaca plants extending into the foothills.

Scotty pointed at drying racks on which Manila hemp fiber, product of the abaca, was drying.